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Lindsay Hill Reads at Middlebury | Thurs., Sept. 25

Categories: Readings

LindsayCropNew England Review and the Middlebury College Creative Writing Program are pleased to present author Lindsay Hill, winner of the 2014 PEN USA Literary Award for Fiction.

He will read from and discuss his new novel, Sea of Hooks at Middlebury College’s Axinn Center, Abernethy Room at 4:30 p.m.

New York magazine and Publishers Weekly both named Sea of Hooks a top 10 book of 2013. Excerpts of its opening chapters are featured in New England Review (34.2). Publishers Weekly describes the book as “an almost impossibly sustained performance from beginning to end. Nearly every paragraph astonishes, every moment rich with magic and daring.”

Lindsay Hill was born in San Francisco and graduated from Bard College. Since 1974, he has published six books of poetry and his work has appeared in a wide variety of literary journals. Sea of Hooks is his first novel, the product of nearly twenty years of work. His other writing and editorial projects include the production of a series of recordings of innovative writing under the Spoken Engine label, and the co-editing, with Paul Naylor, of the literary journal Facture. Since leaving a career in banking, he has worked in the nonprofit sector. He lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife, the painter Nita Hill.

For more about Lindsay Hill, see the McPherson and Company website.

From Sea of Hooks | By Lindsay Hill

Categories: Fiction

From Lindsay Hill’s novel Sea of Hooks, in the current issue (34.2):

sea of hooks

GLASS

Of the great Victorian conservatory in Golden Gate Park, known formally as the Hall of Flowers, Christopher Westall’s mother had once said, “This is a place where glass is safe.” For some reason he thought of this first on finding her body, the plastic bag fitted so snuggly over her face. He held her hand awhile there in the cold. It felt reef-stiff. Her eyes were closed. She had somehow managed to tuck herself in quite tightly. Her face was soft, expressionless and tired. No hint of how it had been for her to die, there on the bed in his room, the bed under which he once thought knife-people slept.

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