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New Books for April From NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books

Poetry, Literary Criticism, and
a Reconsideration of Europe’s Darkest Modern Days

41hGZqVGNKL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_“This book’s a little crazy . . . it’s also packed with truth.”

Mark Bibbins‘ new book of poetry, They Don’t Kill You Because They’re Hungry, They Kill You Because They’re Full, is out this month from Copper Canyon Press. His work has appeared in several issues of NER (“Arriving in Your New Country / Dilemma” in 29.4, and “Grief!” in 34.2).

Publisher’s Weekly: “Bibbin’s newest displays his caustic wit and probing insight admit an exhilarating range of cultural references.”

From NPR: “The book’s a little crazy, packed with air quotes and brackets, jokes and condemnations, forms that explode across the page. Crazily enough, it’s also packed with truth.”

Mark Bibbins  teaches in the graduate writing programs at The New School and Columbia University. His most recent poetry collections are The Anxiety of Coincidence (Floating Wolf Quarterly Chapbooks, 2012), and The Dance of No Hard Feelings (Copper Canyon, 2009). His poems have appeared in Poetry, Paris Review, Boston Review, Tin House, Best American Poetry, and more.

 

51qexzrdGML._SY344_BO1204203200_-200x300NER congratulates Marianne Boruch on the publication of her newest sequence of poems, Cadaver, Speak (Copper Canyon Press). Marianne’s work was first published in NER in 1994 (16.4) and her literary criticism “The End Inside It,” selected as a prose feature by Poetry Daily, appears in NER 33.2.

Marianne Boruch speaks to the Georgia Review about the project from which the poems emerged: “This thirty-page sequence of poems—“Cadaver, Speak”—grew out of a profoundly odd privilege given me in the fall of 2008 by Purdue University, where I’ve taught for twenty-three years. I was awarded the provost office’s “Faculty Fellowship in the Study of a Second Discipline” but, in fact, I had double luck. James Walker of the IU School of Medicine on Purdue’s campus allowed me to participate in his gross human anatomy course (the so-called “cadaver lab”), and Grace O’Brien—artist, and teacher of life drawing at Purdue—said yes, I could join her class, too.”

Marianne Boruch currently teaches in the M.F.A. program at Purdue University and in the Warren Wilson M.F.A. Program for Writers. Her most recent poetry collections are The Book of Hours (Copper Canyon, 2011) and Grace, Fallen from (Wesleyan, 2008).

 

Frederick Brown Cover Photo“A brilliant reconsideration.”

Frederick Brown‘s biographical narrative, The Embrace of Unreason: France, 1914–1940 (Knopf), traces writers such as Maurice Barres and Charles Murras through France’s descent into instability after the first World War.

From the publisher: The Embrace of Unreason is “a brilliant reconsideration of the events and the political, social, and religious movements that led to France’s embrace of Fascism
and anti-Semitism . . . Brown masterfully brings to life Europe’s—and France’s—darkest modern years.”

Frederick Brown has been published in NER multiple times, most recently in NER 30.4 with Alexis de Toqueville’s Impressions of America: Three Letters, a translation from the French.

 

9780674430662_p0_v1_s260x420We congratulate Denis Donoghue, professor of English, Irish, and American Literatures at New York University, and NER contributor, on the publication of Metaphor (Harvard University Press). Reflected on every page of Metaphor are the accumulated wisdom of decades of reading and a sheer love of language and life. His literary criticism, “Yeats, Trying to Be Modern,” appears in NER 31.4.

Publisher’s Weekly: “In this prodigiously learned meditation, Donoghue takes readers through the history of the rhetorical device and its incarnation in poetry, fiction, philosophy, and everyday life.”

Denis Donoghue is a member of the International Association of University Professors of English and the Association of Literary Scholars and Teachers. He has published books on English, Irish, and American literature and the aesthetics and practices of reading. His recent books include Speaking of Beauty (Yale 2004), The American Classics (Yale 2005), and On Eloquence (Yale 2008).

Book can be purchased from Powell’s Books and independent booksellers.