Tags » Matthew Thorburn

 
 
 

New Books from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books


“First books don’t usually take on the world at this level of seriousness and skill”

Hardship_Post2Jehanne Dubrow‘s first poetry collection, The Hardship Post, is being re-released by Sundress Publications

From Stanley Plumly, author of Argument & Song: “There’s a tensile strength of line here—predominantly pentameter—
that underscores the ease of the poetic idiom: just as the heartfelt yet disciplined feeling—life of the content underwrites this collection’s larger themes of Judaism and its ancient traditions. The Hardship Post has a good deal on its mind as well as the load in its heart. Polish history and heritage may be one personal focus, but displacement and identity are the greater subjects. First books don’t usually take on the world at this level of seriousness and skill.”

The Hardship Post includes work previously published in NER. Dubrow’s poetry has appeared in NER 26.2 and 30.2. 

 

 

Bangalore“gritty, hard-hitting debut”

NER contributor Kerry James Evans has published his first book of poetry, Bangalore, with Copper Canyon Press. Appearing in Bangalore is “A Good Hunt,” originally published in NER 30.2.

From Publishers Weekly: “Evans’s gritty, hard-hitting debut combines war poems, elegies, and high Southern lyrics to create a new understanding of American identity.”

From Brian Spears of The Rumpus: “Evans spares nothing and no one in his poems, and yet he still finds a way to celebrate what deserves celebrating, and in the end, we’re left with hope.”

 

Every Possible Blue“tender observation[s] not of the clothing but of the wearer”

We are pleased to announce that NER author Matthew Thorburn‘s new book of poetry, Every Possible Blue, has been published by CW Books. Thorburn’s poem “Proof” appeared in NER 30.1.

From Publishers Weekly: “Saturated with color and light, Thorburn’s second collection celebrates New York with deft, vivacious strokes. Similar to the way a city is always rebuilt, or a painter reworks a canvas, Thorburn’s poems pay special attention to the clothing and adornments that change to fit life’s varied occasions. ‘Oh to be crisply cuffed, / something in fall flannel to flatter / this flaneur,’ he writes in ‘Men Swear.’ An airy poem describing a white blouse—’like a sail’ with ‘two buttons un / done / a peek of pale breast / bone’—becomes a tender observation not of the clothing but of the wearer. But ‘inky / silks, slinky satins’ don’t fool Thorburn. No matter what people wear, whether it is a second-hand tuxedo or a ‘mint green’ sari, he reminds himself, ‘you’re human, / you’re human.'”

 

New Books by NER Authors: This Time Tomorrow

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

NER contributor Matthew Thorburn has published a new collection of poetry, This Time Tomorrow, with Waywiser Press.

From the publisher: “In This Time Tomorrow, Matthew Thorburn searches for his own particular answer to some fundamental questions: Why do we travel? Why seek out new places and cultures, only to have to leave them? Whether writing about Japan, China or Iceland, Thorburn brings his sharp eye and musical ear to the poet’s work: honoring with words the mysteries and wonders…to be found in whatever landscape we choose to wander.” 

Matthew Thorburn is the author of three books of poems, This Time TomorrowEvery Possible Blue and Subject to Change, and a chapbook, Disappears in the Rain. His work has appeared in The Paris ReviewMichigan Quarterly ReviewPloughshares and many other journals, and his poem “Proof was featured in NER 30.1.

This Time Tomorrow is available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other booksellers.

 

New Books from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

Paula Bohince

The Children

“Another writer with Paula Bohince’s gift for the ravishing image—and such writers are very few—would have us on our guard. We are wary of beauty; we have seen too often what beauty leaves out. But Bohince, in her magical capture of the material world, scorns all euphemizing edits; ‘the condom listing against milk-/weed’ is registered as scrupulously in these pages as are the combs of the abandoned hive. Which makes these poems transformative in the true and difficult sense: they bestow on the world the blessing of having-been-seen. And beauty too: ‘Something to recall / as beautiful, in the future. As the sewer was / in summer. Little childhood river.'” (Linda Gregerson)

 

Gordon Bowker

James Joyce: A New Biography

“It is a great boon that British biographer Gordon Bowker, who has written lives of Malcolm Lowry, George Orwell and Lawrence Durrell, should have taken on this task, and better yet that he has produced such a fine portrait of the artist and the man who was James Joyce . . . Instead of being daunted by Joyce having in a sense got there before him, Bowker makes this a strength, as he skillfully presents incidents and experiences both as they happened in life and, suitably transformed to varying degrees, on the page . . . the reader has the best of both worlds, being informed—or in the case of those already familiar with the books, reminded—both of the glories of Joycean fiction and of their roots in his life. Never reductive, genuinely attuned to both Joyce’s fictive methodology and his human qualities, Bowker manages to be immensely sympathetic to his subject while managing to preserve necessary critical distance and acuity.” (Martin Rubin, San Francisco Chronicle)

 

Michael Collier

An Individual History

“Collier’s sixth collection engages with childhood, fatherhood, and family life, in the living present and memorial past, a history explored with brilliantly precise detail and originality of perspective.” (Publishers Weekly)

 

Eduardo C. Corral

Slow Lightning

“[W]e can make of what would blind us a conduit for changed vision, suggests Corral. In these poems, a cage implies all the rest that lies outside it; any frame frames a window through which to see other possibilities unfolding… Like Hayden, Corral resists reductivism.  Gay, Chicano, ‘Illegal-American,’ that’s all just language, and part of Corral’s point is that language, like sex, is fluid and dangerous and thrilling, now a cage, now a window out.  In Corral’s refusal to think in reductive terms lies his great authority.  His refusal to entirely trust authority wins my trust as a reader.” (Carl Phillips, from the Foreword)

 

Norman Lock

Escher’s Journal

“Lock’s work seems to emanate…from an essential strangeness, an estrangement from easily agreed-upon psychologies, from popular culture, from anything resembling a zeitgeist. It is marked by an eerie tonality and an intense, unsettled intellectual curiosity—a Lock novel might take place during any time period, anywhere in the world.” (Dawn Raffel)

 

Padgett Powell

You & Me

“Wonderful…You & Me is by turns hilarious, depressing, gnomic, smutty, and just a far better Saturday night than anything to be had in Jacksonville and Baskersfield combined.” (BookForum)

“…swaggering genius and ribald wit.” (Vanity Fair)

 

Gregory Spatz

Inukshuk

“Inukshuk is a feat of empathy and honesty, a taut tale of fear and resentment and other threats from within, meticulously observed and fearlessly rendered in vivid, authoritative, gripping prose. It’s a virtuoso performance.” (Doug Dorst)

 

 

Craig Morgan Teicher

To Keep Love Blurry 

“A liberating push-back against the idea of economy. More play, more improvisation, and more defiantly deadpan humor – this is the vital shot-in-the-arm American poetry needs.” (D. A. Powell)

 

 

Matthew Thorburn

Every Possible Blue

“If Fred Astaire could write, it might sound like this: practiced, complex, graceful…These are a sequence of anecdotes daring to love again, dreaming in daylight.” (Grace Cavalieri)