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NER Vermont Reading Series: November 8, 2012

Categories: NER Community, NER VT Reading Series

On Thursday, November 8, 7 p.m., at Carol’s Hungry Mind Cafe in Middlebury, four writers will read from their work as part of the NER Vermont Reading Series: Benjamin Aleshire, Larry Bradley, Bette Moffett,* and Marguerite Sullivan.

* Unfortunately, Bette Moffett will not be able to participate. We hope to reschedule her soon.

Benjamin Aleshire is editor of The Salon. His poetry has appeared in Crab Orchard Review, Seven Days, and elsewhere. He is a Creation Grant recipient from the Vermont Arts Council and is currently in residence at the BCA Center. His play, Gauvain the Good Knight, won the 2009 Nor’Easter Playwright Competition, and he recently placed third for the Neil Shepard Poetry Prize. Benjamin also tours internationally with the Vermont Joy Parade. Dropped Apples (2012) is his first book of poems.

Larry Bradley’s work has appeared in the New Republic, the New York Times, the Paris Review, Poetry, the Southwest Review, and the New England Review. He has received the Morton Marr Poetry Prize and the Reginald Shepherd Memorial Prize, and was a Tennessee Williams Scholar at Sewanee. He lives in the Northeast Kingdom.

Bette Moffett, author of the memoir Roots, Shoots and Wings (2010), has been a resident and active community builder in Brandon for forty-two years. Her passions include theater and vocal music.

Marguerite W. Sullivan‘s work has appeared in or is forthcoming from the Georgia Review, Denver Quarterly, NOON, Conjunctions Web, gigantic, and Sleepingfish, among others. She has lived in Pawlet, Vermont, with her children for five years. Currently she is at work finishing a novel.

This event is free and open to the public. Carol’s is located at 24 Merchants Row in Middlebury.

Sponsored by New England Review, with support from Carol’s Hungry Mind Cafe, the Vermont Book Shop, and Middlebury Community TV, the NER Vermont Reading Series provides an opportunity for Vermont writers to read their work in front of an audience, and to acquaint local audiences with the talented writers who live and work among us.