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Wetland Reflections

Categories: Nonfiction

From Joseph McElroy’s essay, “Wetland Reflections,” in the current issue:

red buoyPeople live here, of course; and close by. The apartment dwellings are visible if you look. Still, amid this population and from my vantage, it is another element I contemplate. Where Eastern Boulevard Bridge carrying the Bruckner Expressway across the Bronx River connects two sections, even neighborhoods, of the south Bronx, you are unlikely to glance out your window, driving east or west, to mark the glimmering, quite narrow road of water below. If you are walking the bridge, going home from work or with your child, you can pause to see to the south this substantial stream bending left as it approaches its mouth just out of sight, a mile away, joining estuaries with the East River. Nearer at hand, Cube Smart Self-Storage, scrap metal warehouses, flats fixed, body work, a car-wash, a U-Haul, Gulf station, checks cashed, a paper-recycling facility are for the eye like the city sounds that can seem to hide the river. Yet in the near distance, in a boat slipping past a dilapidated two-story industrial building, three or four young people rowing pause, like a distinct exception, as the person with the sweep oar in the stern, a woman, addresses them, and you can feel some waterborne privacy of the talk you can’t hear.

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[image: “Boya roja” / franciscobernalperez / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0]

 

Announcing the new NER: Vol. 34, #1

Categories: News & Notes

The new issue of New England Review has just shipped from the printer, and a preview is available here on our website. In this issue, Joseph McElroy turns his mind to the ways of wetlands and the costs of human intervention; Kathleen Chaplin listens for the death knock through generations of her Irish family; Ashley Hope Pérez assesses Anne Sexton’s difficult ambitions as a poet and teacher; Joanne Jacobson follows her mother into a garden that grows smaller with time; and in a selection of letters spanning his productive career, Italo Calvino reveals his life as a writer conditioned by history.

Also in these pages you’ll find new poems by Aaron Baker, Reginald Dwayne Betts, Joanne Dominique Dwyer, Tarfia Faizullah, Debora Greger, Benjamin S. Grossberg, Joshua R. Helms, James Hoch, Maria Hummel, Eric Pankey, Melissa Range, and Andres Rojas; new fiction from Michael Coffey, Kathryn Davis, Steve De Jarnatt, Lisa Van Orman Hadley, and Christine Sneed; and a translation of Yves Bonnefoy by Hoyt Rogers. On the cover is Schroon River #2 by Irma Cerese. We dedicate this issue to NER contributor A. J. Sherman (1934–2013): distinguished author, generous friend, unfailing observer.

Get a copy of the beautiful new issue here — or better yet, subscribe!