New Books from NER Authors

The fluidity with which Barot walks this difficult line between meaning and certainty makes these poems feel more born than made. This is a fantastic book.—Bob Hicok 

Rick Barot, poetry editor for New England Review since fall 2014, has recently published a new book of poetry, Chord (Sarabande Books).

“Barot demonstrates his mastery of image throughout this collection of meditative, personal poems in which language is a boat that ‘cuts the water, like scissors/into fabric.’ At his best, Barot seamlessly weaves history, image, and etymology in ways that offer the reader new eyes to see language and the world it describes.”            —Publishers Weekly

Barot has also published The Darker Fall (2002), winner of the Kathryn A. Morton Prize, and Want (2008), a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and winner of the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. His poems and essays have appeared in Poetry, Paris Review, New Republic, Ploughshares, Tin House, Kenyon Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, Threepenny Review, and more.

Chord is available from Sarabande Books and independent booksellers.

Bayer tells a taut, gritty tale that gives a fresh and revealing insight into the Soviet Union of the Khrushchev years. —William Ryan, author of The Holy Thief, The Darkening Field, and The Twelfth Department.

410O1v-fdrL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_Congratulations to Alexei Bayer on his new mystery novel, The Latchkey Murders, a prequel to the first novel in the series “Murder at the Dacha” (Russian Information Services, Inc). Bayer’s short stories have appeared in NER 19.426.1, and 31.2.

From the publisher: “A serial killer is on the loose in Khrushchev’s Moscow, rattling the foundations of the communist state (such anti-social crimes only occur in decadent bourgeois societies, after all). The victims are as pitifully innocent as the crimes are grievous . . .”

Bayer lives in New York and is a writer and translator in both English and Russian. His short fiction has been published in Kenyon ReviewChtenia, and New England Review.

The Latchkey Murders is available from Russian Life and independent booksellers.

The collection demonstrates Beattie’s craftsmanship, precise language, and her knack for revealing psychological truths.  —Publishers Weekly

UnknownNew England Review contributor Ann Beattie has published a new collection of short stories, The State We’re In: Maine Stories (Scribner). Beattie’s fiction appeared in NER‘s very first issue (1978).

“The 15 loosely connected stories in Beattie’s latest collection, set on Maine’s southern coast, feature drifting adults and their rootless offspring at seemingly unimportant moments that are in fact critical.”                 —Publishers Weekly

Beattie has received the PEN/Malamud Award and the Rea Award for her stories, and has been included in John Updike’s The Best American Short Stories of the Century and four O. Henry Award collections. She is currently the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia.

The State We’re In is available from Powell’s Books and independent booksellers.

For years Gregerson has been one of poetry’s mavens . . . whose poetics seek truth through the precise apprehension of the beautiful while never denying the importance of rationality  —Chicago Tribune

Unknown-1New England Review is pleased to announce the publication of Linda Gregerson‘s new collection of poetry, Prodigal (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Many of Gregerson’s poems have appeared in NER, most recently “Theseus Forgetting” in 31.4.

From the publisher: “Prodigal [ranges] broadly in subject from class in America to our world’s ravaged environment to the wonders of parenthood to the intersection of science and art to the passion of the Roman gods, and beyond . . . A brilliant stylist, known for her formal experiments as well as her perfected lines, Gregerson is a poet of great vision. Here, the growth of her art and the breadth of her interests offer a snapshot of a major poet’s intellect in the midst of her career.”

Linda Gregerson is the author of Waterborne, The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep, and Fire in the Conservatory. A recent Guggenheim Fellow, she teaches Renaissance literature and creative writing at the University of Michigan. Her poems have appeared in The Best American Poetry as well as in New England ReviewAtlantic Monthly, Poetry, PloughsharesYale Review, TriQuarterly, and other publications. Among her many awards and honors are an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, four Pushcart Prizes, and a Kingsley Tufts Award.

Prodigal is available from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and from independent booksellers.

Binding together and moving through this delectable collection there’s a mystery, the one that makes you keep turning the pages . . . —Kathryn Davis, author of Duplex

Mitchell-ViralEmily Mitchell has published her new collection of stories, Viral (W. W. Norton).

From the publisher: “The characters in these stories find that the world they thought they knew has shifted and changed, become bizarre and disorienting, and, occasionally, miraculous. Told with absurdist humor and sweet sadness, Viral is about being lost in places that are supposed to feel like home.”

Mitchell’s stories have appeared in many magazines, including Harper’s and Ploughshares. Three of the stories from this collection first appeared in NER: “Lucille’s House” (28.2), “On Friendship” (31.3), and “Three Marriages” (34.2). She teaches at the University of Maryland.

Viral is available from Powell’s Books and independent booksellers.

Three Marriages | By Emily Mitchell

From the current issue (34.2):

Eamon_Everall._The_Love_LetterShortly after they moved from their own house in Darien, Connecticut, into a retirement home near Fort Myers, Florida, Lucinda announced that she didn’t want to be married anymore to Fred, her husband of fifty-nine years. When she told her children this they were first horrified and then dismissive. She could not mean it, they said to her and to each other. She could not possibly be serious. They interpreted it as a sign that she was becoming senile, that her mind and judgment, which had until then remained very sharp, were becoming impaired. They took her to get tested for other signs of reduced cognitive function, but the doctors they spoke with found Lucinda to be lucid and competent, her memory of recent and distant events remarkably intact for someone of her age, which was eighty-three years old.

“But what about this idea that she’s going to leave my father?” her son, Harry, asked the gerontologist who administered the battery of tests. “If that doesn’t count as crazy, I don’t know what does.”

The doctor looked at him and shrugged.

“I can’t comment on whether your mother is making a sensible choice in this matter,” he said. “But she is able to talk about her decision with perfect clarity. Being sane is in no way related to being wise.”

[read more]

The Right Address

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Emily Mitchell’s short story “Lucille’s House” appeared in NER 28.2:

“What were you waiting for?” Lucille asks when he gets to the top. 

“Well, I wasn’t sure this was the right address,” he says. “I didn’t want to go knocking on someone else’s front door in the middle of the night, scaring them half to death. What would you think if some strange black man came to your door in the middle of the night in this neighborhood . . .”

“I would think he probably needed a cup of coffee.”

“You know what I mean.”

“Sure, but I gave you the correct address, baby. I can see you’ve got it right there.” And indeed, he is holding the piece of paper she gave to the driver. It has the address written on it in her own handwriting. 

“I know. But, honestly . . .” he is looking past her now into the front hall. His eyes look like a child’s at Christmas before the presents are opened. “I didn’t believe that a house this nice was mine. Is it?” She sees that he is crying. He has never had a house of his own before, either. 

“It is,” she says. “It’s yours. I promise.”

Potomac Theatre Project Tribute Event for NER

Potomac Theatre Project will host a tribute event for New England Review in New York City on July 16, 2012, 7:30 p.m., at the Atlantic Stage 2 (330 West 16th Street, between 8th & 9th Avenues). This evening features readings from five outstanding NER and Middlebury alumni authors—David Gilbert ’90, Cate Marvin, Emily Mitchell ’97, Greg Pierce, and Patrick Phillips—with a reception to follow.

IMPORTANT UPDATE: Tickets are currently sold out but seats may be available on a first-come first-served basis the night of the event. Because seating was limited, we issued tickets for this event via Ticket Central.

David Gilbert has had his short stories published in the New Yorker, Harper’s, GQ, Bomb, and other magazines. His short story collection, Remote Feed, was published by Scribner in 1998, and his novel, The Normals, was published by Bloomsbury in 2004. His new novel, & Sons, will be published by Random House in May 2013. His screenplay for Joshua was made into a film starring Sam Rockwell and Vera Farmiga, which Fox Searchlight released in 2007. Various other movie projects are in existential stages of being and non-being. David lives in New York City with his wife and three children.

Cate Marvin is the author of two poetry collections, World’s Tallest Disaster (2001) and Fragment of the Head of a Queen (2007), both published by Sarabande. Her third book of poems is forthcoming from Norton in 2013. Her poems have recently appeared in New England Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and Tin House. She teaches creative writing at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York, and in the low-residency M.F.A. program at Lesley University.

Emily Mitchell‘s first novel, The Last Summer of the World (Norton) was a finalist for the New York Public Library’s Young Lions Award. Her stories have appeared in New England Review, Ploughshares, and TriQuarterly, and is forthcoming in Alaska Quarterly Review. Her reviews have been published in the New York Times and the New Statesman. She received her BA from Middlebury College and her MFA from Brooklyn College. She recently joined the creative writing faculty at The University of Maryland.

Greg Pierce‘s plays include Slowgirl (Lincoln Center Theater), The Landing, written with composer John Kander (Vineyard Theatre), and The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, written with director Stephen Earnhart, based on the novel by Haruki Murakami (Ohio Theatre, Edinburgh International Festival, Singapore Arts Festival).  His stories have appeared in Avery, Berkeley Fiction Review, Confrontation, New England Review, and Web Conjunctions. He has received fellowships from the Edward F. Albee Foundation, The Djerassi Institute, the New York Public Library, and the Baryshnikov Arts Center.

Patrick Phillips is a long-time contributor to New England Review and a recent Guggenheim and NEA Fellow. He is author of the poetry collections Chattahoochee, winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Prize, and Boy, and translator of When We Leave Each Other: Selected Poems of Henrik Nordbrandt. He lives in Brooklyn and teaches at Drew University.