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New Books for May from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

 

The most moving and expansive poet to come out of the American Midwest since 9780393246124_198James Wright.”

New England Review congratulates David Baker on the publication of his new book of poetry, Scavenger Loop (W. W. Norton & Company). Baker is an NER author with poetry forthcoming in NER 36.2.

Baker’s latest work layers the natural history of his beloved Midwest and traces the “complex history of human habitation, from family and village life to the evolving nature of work and the mysterious habitats of the heart.”

David Baker is the author of Never-Ending Birds and several other collections, and has won awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Ohio Arts Council, Poetry Society of America, Society of Midland Authors, and the Pushcart Foundation. He is editor of the Kenyon Review and teaches at Denison University.

 Purchase this book at W.W. Norton & Company or at independent booksellers.

 

riverhouseCongratulations to NER contributor Sally Keith on the publication of her newest collection, River House (Milkweed Editions, 2015), which features poems of absence written after the loss of her mother. Keith is the author of The Fact of the Matter and two previous collections of poetry, Design and Dwelling Song. She is a faculty member of the MFA program at George Mason University and lives in Washington, DC. Keith’s poem “Song from the Rain” appeared in NER 24.4, and two  poems, “In the Desert Near . . .” and “What heavenward gesture . . . ” in NER 33.2. In addition, her essay “The Spirit of the Beehive” appeared as an original New England Review Digital piece in our ongoing series, Confluences.

“. . . when you’re finished reading, your dream comes true: you can read the poems again.  I do not know of a book of poems that embodies more heartbreakingly or more intelligently the experience of irreconcilable loss.” —James Longenbach, author of The Iron Key

Purchase River House at Milkweed Editions or at independent booksellers. 

 

testament_bookstore“Waldrep offers us his most necessary book, one that asks us that question we fear ourselves to ask: how is this real, any of it, all of it, faith, language, light, history, and that cipher that collects them all, the human heart?” —Dan Beachy-Quick

We are pleased to announce the publication of G. C. Waldrep‘s latest work, Testament (BOA Editions, 2015). From the publisher: A book-length poem, Testament addresses matters as diverse as Mormonism, cymatics, race, Dolly the cloned sheep, and his own life and faith. Drafted over twelve trance-like days while in residence at Hawthornden Castle, Waldrep . . . tackles the question of whether gender can be a lyric form. Intimately autobiographical, Waldrep’s fifth book masterly takes its own place in the American tradition of the long poem.

Waldrep’s most recent poems in New England Review include “What David Taught and Where He Taught It” (NER 34.3-4) and “Their Faces Shall Be As Flames” (NER 35.3). The recipient of multiple awards, Waldrep teaches at Bucknell University, is editor for the literary journal West Branch, and editor-at-large for Kenyon Review.

Purchase Testament at BOA Editions, Ltd. or at independent booksellers. 

 

Russian_Poetry“An enchanting collection of the very best of Russian poetry.” — Penguin Classics

NER congratulates Robert Chandler and Boris Dralyuk on their new anthology The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry (edited with poet Irina Mashinski, Penguin Classics, 2015). From the publisher: This anthology traces Russian poetry from its Golden Age to the modern era, including work by several great poets—Georgy Ivanov and Varlam Shalamov among them—in captivating modern translations.

Chandler and Dralyuk’s translations and writings have appeared in the special section “The Russian Presence” of New England Review‘s double issue 34.3-4. Chandler is a poet and translator of many works of Russian literature and teaches part time at Queen Mary, University of London. Dralyuk is a lecturer in Russian at the University of St. Andrews and translator of many books from Russian.

Purchase The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry from Penguin Classics or an independent bookseller. 

  “A new book of poems—or of anything—by Mark Doty is good news in a dark time. The precision, daring, scope, elegance of his compassion and of the language in which he embodies it are a reassuring pleasure.” —W. S. Merwin

 

9780224099837-1-edition.default.original-1We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Doty‘s newest collection of poems Deep Lane (Norton 2015). From Publisher’s Weekly: “Having gained renown for his self-consciously beautiful, heart-on-sleeve elegies, Doty remains elegiac and continues to attend to beauty. He also does some of his best work yet as a nature poet.”

Mark Doty’s work appears in NER volumes 13.3-4, 31.2, and 32.1. He has published eight volumes of poetry, and his collection Fire to Fire won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. Doty’s work has also received numerous honors including the National Book Critics Circle Award and fellowships from the Guggenheim and the National Endowment for the Arts. He is a professor and writer-in-residence at Rutgers University.

Purchase Deep Lane at W. W. Norton & Company or at independent booksellers.

 

New England Review congratulates contributor Lauren Acampora on her debut novel, The Wonder Garden (Grove, 2015). Acampora creates a portrait of a Connecticut suburb through a collection of linked stories that wonder garden coverPublisher’s Weekly calls “intelligent, unnerving, and very often strange.”

From the publisher: “A keen and brilliant observer of the strangeness that is American suburbia. Acampora joins the ranks of writers like John Cheever and Tom Perrotta in her incisive portrait of lives intersecting in one Connecticut town . . . Deliciously creepy and masterfully choreographed, The Wonder Garden heralds the arrival of a phenomenal new talent in American fiction.”

Lauren Acampora’s fiction has appeared in NER 27.3 as well as NER Digital, Paris ReviewMissouri ReviewPrairie Schooner, and Antioch Review. 

Purchase The Wonder Garden from Grove Atlantic or at independent booksellers.

 

“A brace and necessary set of early flares of the literary imagination into the Panopticon we all find ourselves living inside these days.” — Jonathan Lethem

We are excited to announce the publication of Watchlist (OR Books 2015), a collection of short stories about surveillance society edited by NER contributor Bryan Hurt.

Hurt’s work appears in NER 33.2 as well as in American Reader, Kenyon Review, and Tin House, and many others. He has published a novel, Everyone Wants to Be Ambassador to France, and is the winner of the Starcherone Prize for Innovative Fiction.

Purchase Watchlist at OR Books or at independent booksellers.

NER Congratulates 2015 Guggenheim Fellows

Categories: News & Notes

We are pleased to announce that NER contributors Cate Marvin and Maud Casey are among the 175 2015 Guggenheim Fellowship recipients chosen from an applicant pool of almost 3,000 individuals.

Cate Marvin has received numerous honors for her poetry, including the Whiting Award and a Kathryn A. Morton Prize. She has published three books of poetry and currently teaches creative writing at Columbia University’s MFA Program, the College of Staten Island, City University of New York, and in the low-residency MFA program at Lesley University. She has contributed to six issues of NER (19.2, 20.2, 21.1, 22.2, 34.3-4, 36.1).

Maud Casey is the author of three novels, including most recently The Man Who Walked Away, and a collection of stories, Drastic. Her essays and criticism have appeared in A Public SpaceLiterary Imagination, the New York Times Book ReviewOxford American, and Salon. She is the recipient of the Calvino Prize and a DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Artist Fellowship, and has received numerous international residency fellowships for her work in fiction. She is a Professor of English at Maryland University. Her essay on the photography and mystery of Vivian Maier appears in NER Digital.

Congratulations to Maud, Cate, and all of the 2015 Guggenheim recipients!

 

http://www.gf.org/fellows/all-fellows/cate-marvin/

http://www.gf.org/fellows/all-fellows/maud-casey/

Announcing NER 36.1

Categories: News & Notes

The New Issue of NER Has Arrived

Welcome to the first issue of New England Review’s volume 36, the first volume of NER available in print and digital formats for all devices.

POETRY

Sixteen poems by contemporary writers both new and renowned:

Anders Carlson-Wee • Jennifer Chang • Steven Cramer • Jehanne Dubrow • Daisy Fried • Nick Lantz • William Logan • Erin Lynch • Cate Marvin • Emilia Phillips • John Poch • Kevin Prufer • Ocean Vuong • C. K. Williams

FICTION

Fiction writers—all new to the pages of NERMario J. Gonzales, Brendan McKennedy, Carolyn Page, J. T. Price, Lore Segal, and Lisa Taddeo bring us stories from the poorest to the most privileged corners of life in the city, and share tales of the power of music and the power of words, of memories planted along a dusty road, and of a world too watery for anything but the ark of Noah himself.

NONFICTION and TRANSLATION

  • Rob Hardy on the shape-changing, gender-switching imagination of Naomi Mitchison.
  • Luis S. Krausz’s novel of Austro-Hungarian obsession in Brazil, translated from the Portuguese by Ana Fletcher.
  • Rachel Hadas negotiates the space between the living and the dead.
  • Lorraine Hanlon Comanor figure skates to independence.
  • Roger Strittmater, Mark K. Anderson, and Elliott Stone document nineteenth-century American writers’ tussles with Shakespeare.
  • John Kinsella translates a little-known French poet of the sublime.
  • Jill Sisson Quinn unravels the child wish.
  • We revisit Henry Reed Stiles who divulges what we talk about when we talk about bundling.

See the full table of contents, read select pieces, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!

New Books for March from NER Authors

Categories: News & Notes

Dubrow. . . a story so compelling that we put down our tasks and turn to her voice. ––Hilda Raz, author of All Odd and Splendid

We congratulate NER author Jehanne Dubrow on the publication of her fifth book of poems, The Arranged Marriage (University of New Mexico).

Dubrow’s previous poetry collections include Stateside and Red Army RedFrom the Fever-World (2009) which won the Washington Writers’ Poetry Competition, and her first collection The Hardship Post (2009) winner of the Three Candles Press Open Book Award. She is the director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House and is an associate professor of English at Washington College. Dubrow’s poetry most recently appeared in NER 30.2 and her essay on Philip Larkin appeared in 35.1.

 

19781469619989NER congratulates Philip F. Gura on the publication of his latest book The Life of William Apess, Pequot (The University of North Carolina Press, 2015). The biography follows young America’s prejudice against Native Americans through the lens of William Apess, a Native American writer and activist of the 19th century. An excerpt of the book appears in NER 35.4.

Publishers Weekly: “In his engaging, insightful, and thoroughly detailed biography, Gura draws us into the fascinating life of a man who strove to claim a place for himself and his people in this new nation.”

Gura serves as William S. Newman Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill where he teaches English & Comparative Literature, Religious Studies, and American Studies. He is the author or editor of twelve books, including Truth’s Ragged Edge (2014), Jonathan Edwards: The Evangelical Writings (2005), and American Transcendentalism: A History (2007). He also serves as an editor for the Norton Anthology of American Literature.

“NER Out Loud” Brings the Page to the Stage

Categories: News & Notes, Readings

ner_35-2_front_cover-sqIn the tradition of Public Radio International’s “Selected Shorts,” Middlebury College students will read selections from the New England Review in a live performance entitled “NER Out Loud” at the Mahaney Center for the Arts Concert Hall on February 24, 7:30 p.m. The event will be followed by a “S’more Readings” reception with the readers and NER staff, along with representatives of several student literary magazines. Both events are free and open to the public. ASL interpreting provided.

Readers will include Kevin Benscheidt ’17, Brenna Christensen ’17, Caitlyn Duffy ’15.5, Cole Ellison ’17, Jabari Matthew ’17, Melissa MacDonald ’15, and Sally Seitz ’17, with Debanjan Roychoudhury ’16 as MC. Editors and contributors to the student literary magazines Sweatervest, Blackbird, and Room 404 will also be on hand at the post-show reception to discuss their publications and give sample readings from their pages. Attendees will be invited to enjoy s’mores while listening to the readings in the lobby.

NER Out Loud is the result of a new partnership between the Mahaney Center for the Arts, the Oratory Society, and the New England Review. NER Out Loud will take place on Tuesday, February 24, 2015, at 7:30 P.M. in the Concert Hall of the Kevin P. Mahaney ’84 Center for the Arts. The reception will take place in the downstairs lobby immediately following the performance. Admission is free and the public is welcome. The Mahaney Center is located at 72 Porter Field Road in Middlebury, just off Route 30 south, on the campus of Middlebury College. Free parking is available. For more information, call (802) 443-MIDD (6433) or go to http://go.middlebury.edu/arts.

Ricardo Nuila Wins NER Award for Emerging Writers

Categories: News & Notes

Ricardo NuilaIt is with enormous pleasure that New England Review and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference announce the selection of Ricardo Nuila as the recipient of the first annual New England Review Award for Emerging Writers.

Ricardo Nuila is a practicing doctor, professor, and writer. He teaches in the Medicine & Society program at the University of Houston Honors College and works as an attending physician at Baylor College of Medicine. His latest essay on the care of undocumented immigrants was featured in the Winter 2015 issue of VQR and subsequently on Longform.org; other essays have appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine. His fiction has appeared in New England Review, McSweeney’s, Zyzzyva, and Best American Short Stories 2011.

Nuila will attend the 2015 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference as the first New England Review Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Scholar. His story “At the Bedside” appears in NER 35.1. Please join us in wishing Ricardo Nuila congratulations.

Tarfia Faizullah Wins New Writers Award

Categories: News & Notes

Congratulations to NER author Tarfia Faizullah, winner of the 2015 Great Lakes Colleges Association’s New Writers Award in poetry for her new book Seam (Southern Illinois University Press)!

 

According to the GLCA judges:

Tarfia Faizullah’s Seam shimmers with exigent discovery. It looks back with the charge of the absolute present tense and gives voice to what must be named and claimed before the speaker, and the world, can move on. The speaker is a young woman compelled to make a pilgrimage along the seam between “Why call any of it back?” and “yes call it back/back again.” The poems interrogate history via intimate, spiraling, even delicate detail. I admire the way that Faizullah negotiates her authorial vexed position of reporting upon atrocities that both belong and do not belong to her. She recognizes her own position and interrogates it. From start to finish, Seam represents a harrowing act of empathy. As a book and project, this is so powerful, combining modes and formal approaches to explore this little-known part of history. The book is well-crafted and very relevant to our current age.

 

NER Releases Short List for Emerging Writers Award

Categories: News & Notes

New England Review announces, with enormous pleasure, the finalists for the first New England Review Emerging Writers Award.

DSC_3006Please join us in congratulating our six finalists for 2015:

Leslie Bazzett  (34.3-4)
Marcelo Hernandez Castillo  (35.2)
William Fargason  (35.1)
Ricardo Nuila  (35.1)
Larry I. Palmer  (35.1)
Sean Warren  (35.2)

The winner, to be announced later this month, will receive a scholarship to the 2015 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Congratulations to them all—we are proud to have published such strong work from emerging writers in all three genres.

 

New Books for February from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

Curtiss_smallweb-250x386“. . . an elegant chronicle of grief, of the sprawling bonds between brothers and sisters, of bodies in this world, of the power of language when so artfully arranged.” —Roxane Gay

Congratulations to poet Caleb Curtiss on the publication of his collection A Taxonomy of the Space Between Us (Black Lawrence Press, 2015). Curtiss’s work appeared in NER Volume 33.1. His poetry has also been published in a number of literary journals including the Literary Review, PANK, and Hayden’s Ferry Review. He teaches high school English in Champaign, Illinois.

 

 

crow-work2We are pleased to announce the publication of Crow-Work (Milkweed Editions, 2015), the latest collection of poetry from NER author Eric Pankey. Pankey is the author of ten collections of poems, the first of which, The New Year (Atheneum, 1984), earned him the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. His 2013 collection, Dismantling the Angel (Parlor Press, 2013), received the New Measure Prize. Pankey’s poem, “The Weight of Yesterday” appears in NER 34.1.

“Eric Pankey is a poet of precise observation and startling particularities. His wisdom, sometimes sidelong, sometimes direct, both knows and feels. The soundcraft is superb, the modes of investigation by turns lyrical, surreal, meditative, allegorical, direct-speaking, and allusive.” —Jane Hirshfield

 

NER congratulates contributor Quan Barry on the release of her fiction debut, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born (Pantheon, 2015), a novel of modern Vietnam as experienced through the eyes of a young girl born just years before the country’s unification. Barry is the author of four poetry books, including the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry winner Water Puppets, and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry, and her work has appeared in such publications as Ms. and the New Yorker. Barry’s poem, “Lion,” appeared in NER 27.2.

“. . . lyrical, luminous, and suspenseful all at once. Rabbit’s experience of wartime and reconciliation in Vietnam is one that I haven’t yet encountered in fiction, and it is rendered with shocking clarity and pathos on the page.” —Jesmyn Ward, National Book Award-winning author of Salvage the Bones

 

there's something

It is our pleasure to announce the release of contributor Charles Baxter‘s collection of ten stories, There’s Something I Want to Tell You (Pantheon, 2015). Including five stories named for virtue and five for vice, one of the selections from the compilation, “Sloth,” appeared in NER 34.3-4, and his work has also appeared in NER 27.4 and 15.1. Baxter’s third novel, The Feast of Love, was a finalist for the 2000 National Book Award. Baxter’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic, New York Review of Books, and Harper’s, among other journals and magazines. His fiction has been anthologized in Best American Short Stories seven times, eleven times in The Pushcart Prize Anthology, and translated into many languages.

An audio excerpt of Baxter reading from There’s Something I Want to Tell You at the 2014 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference is available here.

“Bare storylines can’t convey the quickly captivating simple narratives . . . or the revealing moments to which Baxter brings the reader. . . Similarly, Baxter, a published poet, at times pushes his fluid, controlled prose to headier altitudes. Nearly as organic as a novel, this is more intriguing, more fun in disclosing its connective tissues through tales that stand well on their own.” —Kirkus Reviews, *starred review*

 

New Books for the New Year from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

coffey“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —Jay Parini, Middlebury College D. E. Axinn Professor of English & Creative Writing and author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station

NER congratulates contributor Michael Coffey on his first collection of short stories, The Business of Naming Things (Bellevue Literary Press, 2015), which includes his story “Sons,” originally published in NER 34.1. Coffey’s essay “Waiting for Nauman” has appeared in our online NER Digital series, as well.

Publisher’s Weekly: There is no conventional narrative here… This collection which features first-, second-, and third-person narration, is vibrant and unsparing.

Edmund White, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own Story: “Michael Coffey brings us so close to his subjects it is almost embarassing. Whether he’s writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?

Michael Coffey has published three books of poems, a book about baseball’s perfect games, and co-edited a book about Irish immigration to America. He is a former co-editorial director of Publishers Weekly.

 

watch me go“Mark Wisniewski has constructed a fabulous noir that touches on the third-rail of American life and the inside rail at the track. His voice is down-to-earth and sharp, delivering swift, salty pages concerning murder and jails, justice and damaged souls.”—Daniel Woodrell, PEN Award winner and Edgar-nominated author of Winter’s Bone

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Wisniewski‘s newest novel, Watch Me Go (Penguin Putnam). His story “Karmic Vapor” appeared in NER 25.1.

Mark Wisniewski has published two novels, Show Up, Look Good and Confessions of a Polish Used Car Salesman. His stories have appeared in a number of publications including Southern Review and Antioch Review.

“The pure, muscular story-telling of Mark Wisniewski’s Watch Me Go made it irresistible.”New York Times bestselling author Salman Rushdie

 

muldoonCongratulations to NER contributor Paul Muldoon on the publication of his newest book of poetry, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). Muldoon, originally from Ireland, is Howard G. B. Clark ’21 Professor at Princeton University and poetry editor of the New Yorker. His most recent collections are Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Horse Latitudes (2006), and Maggot (2010). His essays on Fernando Pessoa, Emily Dickinson and Seamus Heaney have appeared in NER 23.4, 24.2, and 34.2, respectively.

“. . . another wild, expansive collection from the eternally surprising Paul Muldoon, 2003 winner and poetry editor at the New Yorker. ‘Watchfulness’ is the buzzword surrounding this one, and it seems as great a place as any to start the 2015 reading year.” —Publisher’s Weekly

 

sandoperaIt is with pleasure that we announce the release of NER contributor Philip Metres‘s newest poetry collection, Sand Opera (Alice James, 2015), an exploration of war in the modern age through examinations of the Abu Ghraib prison, childhood perspectives, and the role of the US government. Metres is the author of A Concordance of Leaves, abu ghraib arias, To See the Earth, Behind the Lines: War Resistance Poetry on the American Homefront Since 1941, and other books. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry and has garnered numerous awards, including two NEA fellowships, four Ohio Arts Council Grants, the Arab American Book Award, and a 2014 Creative Workforce Fellowship. He teaches literature and creative writing at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Metres’s translations from Russian were published in NER 34.3-4, and his poetry has appeared in 22.3, 23.4, and 25.4.

“Phil Metres transforms our prostrate sorrow and gracious rage against the banal evil of the administered world into aria and opera.” —Fady Joudah, author of Alight and The Earth in the Attic