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New Books for the New Year from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

coffey“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —Jay Parini, Middlebury College D. E. Axinn Professor of English & Creative Writing and author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station

NER congratulates contributor Michael Coffey on his first collection of short stories, The Business of Naming Things (Bellevue Literary Press, 2015), which includes his story “Sons,” originally published in NER 34.1. Coffey’s essay “Waiting for Nauman” has appeared in our online NER Digital series, as well.

Publisher’s Weekly: There is no conventional narrative here… This collection which features first-, second-, and third-person narration, is vibrant and unsparing.

Edmund White, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own Story: “Michael Coffey brings us so close to his subjects it is almost embarassing. Whether he’s writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?

Michael Coffey has published three books of poems, a book about baseball’s perfect games, and co-edited a book about Irish immigration to America. He is a former co-editorial director of Publishers Weekly.

 

watch me go“Mark Wisniewski has constructed a fabulous noir that touches on the third-rail of American life and the inside rail at the track. His voice is down-to-earth and sharp, delivering swift, salty pages concerning murder and jails, justice and damaged souls.”—Daniel Woodrell, PEN Award winner and Edgar-nominated author of Winter’s Bone

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Wisniewski‘s newest novel, Watch Me Go (Penguin Putnam). His story “Karmic Vapor” appeared in NER 25.1.

Mark Wisniewski has published two novels, Show Up, Look Good and Confessions of a Polish Used Car Salesman. His stories have appeared in a number of publications including Southern Review and Antioch Review.

“The pure, muscular story-telling of Mark Wisniewski’s Watch Me Go made it irresistible.”New York Times bestselling author Salman Rushdie

 

muldoonCongratulations to NER contributor Paul Muldoon on the publication of his newest book of poetry, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). Muldoon, originally from Ireland, is Howard G. B. Clark ’21 Professor at Princeton University and poetry editor of the New Yorker. His most recent collections are Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Horse Latitudes (2006), and Maggot (2010). His essays on Fernando Pessoa, Emily Dickinson and Seamus Heaney have appeared in NER 23.4, 24.2, and 34.2, respectively.

“. . . another wild, expansive collection from the eternally surprising Paul Muldoon, 2003 winner and poetry editor at the New Yorker. ‘Watchfulness’ is the buzzword surrounding this one, and it seems as great a place as any to start the 2015 reading year.” —Publisher’s Weekly

 

sandoperaIt is with pleasure that we announce the release of NER contributor Philip Metres‘s newest poetry collection, Sand Opera (Alice James, 2015), an exploration of war in the modern age through examinations of the Abu Ghraib prison, childhood perspectives, and the role of the US government. Metres is the author of A Concordance of Leaves, abu ghraib arias, To See the Earth, Behind the Lines: War Resistance Poetry on the American Homefront Since 1941, and other books. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry and has garnered numerous awards, including two NEA fellowships, four Ohio Arts Council Grants, the Arab American Book Award, and a 2014 Creative Workforce Fellowship. He teaches literature and creative writing at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Metres’s translations from Russian were published in NER 34.3-4, and his poetry has appeared in 22.3, 23.4, and 25.4.

“Phil Metres transforms our prostrate sorrow and gracious rage against the banal evil of the administered world into aria and opera.” —Fady Joudah, author of Alight and The Earth in the Attic

 

Announcing NER 35.4

Categories: News & Notes

 THE NEW ISSUE OF NER HAS ARRIVED!

POETRY
Rick Barot
‘s inaugural issue as poetry editor introduces twelve poets who have never before published with NER. We welcome Rick and his poets, and the exactitude and joy he brings to these pages.

Luke Brekke Kevin Craft Andrew Grace • Ela Harrison • Joanna Klink • Joan Larkin • Michelle Peñaloza • Patrick Rosal • Richard Siken • Austin Smith • Arthur Sze • Eleanor Wilner

FICTION
Fiction writers Allegra Hyde and Susan Engberg make their NER debut alongside returning NER authors Matthew Baker, Castle Freeman Jr., and William Gilson, with stories of shark fishing, squirrel trouble, and a Sensei gone on the lam. 

Matthew Baker • Susan Engberg • Castle Freeman Jr. • William Gilson • Allegra Hyde

ESSAYS
The essays in this issue range from a struggle to say hello to the struggle to say goodbye, and in between reach out to a family’s past, a nation’s past, and a literary past. 

  • Elizabeth Kadetsky investigates the ether of her family’s imagined past
  • Kelly Grey Carlisle solves for X
  • Philip F. Gura reignites the reputation of an early Native American orator
  • Norman Mailer reads and writes the twentieth century
  • Chris Nelson articulates the stuttering of Neil Young’s guitar
  • Laurence de Looze loses himself in the enchanted alleyways of the Alfama
  • John Cowper Powys presents the “best books,” 1916
  • Bill Johnston translates the story of everyone’s old family dog by Polish author Andrzej Stasiuk

COVER ART
Margaret Withers

Don’t miss this ambitious and unpredictable collection of writing—just published.

See the full table of contents, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!

NER + NEA = More Support for Writers

Categories: News & Notes

NEA-logo-color-e1320093807889New England Review is delighted to announce that we’ve won the support of the National Endowment for the Arts for 2015 through an Art Works grant. In 2014 we were able to double our payment to writers for the print journal—the first increase in 20 years—and because of this grant we’ll be able to continue paying this higher rate through the next volume. But this year we’re going to do even better: beginning in 2015 we will pay contributors to NER Digital, our feature of original writing for the web. Up until now writers have been gracious enough to allow their work to be published there for the gift of a subscription to NER, but now we’ll be able to pay them an honorarium in cold hard cash as well. We’d like to thank associate editor J. M. Tyree for his dedication to the NER Digital project—for masterminding the idea and building it through its first years.

The NEA’s fellowships for writers, which in 2015 will be awarded to 36 poets, will honor a number of NER contributors. Congratulations to all who earned a place on the list this year, including Sean Hill (NER Digital), Eliot Khalil Wilson (29.4), Kerry James Evans (30.2), Anders Carlson-Wee (forthcoming, 36.1), Sara Eliza Johnson (29.4), Shara Lessley (33.1), and Melissa Range (34.1).

2015 Pushcart Prize

Categories: News & Notes

2015CoverHomeCongratulations to all of this year’s Pushcart Prize winners. This year’s anthology has just been released, and we’re particularly pleased to note the inclusion of NER authors Tarfia Faizullah (“The Streetlamp Above Me Darkens“), as a recipient of the award, and Michael Coffey (NER 34.1), for special mention in fiction.

New Books for November from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, News & Notes


brocke-clarke
Clarke dazzles with a dizzying study in extremes, cruising at warp speed between bleak and optimistic, laugh-out-loud funny and unbearable sadness. His comedy of errors is impossible to put downPublishers Weekly

Brock Clarke has published his new book, The Happiest People in the World. Clarke’s work has appeared in several issues of NER, most recently in the current issue and 33.1.

Clarke is the author of five works of fiction, including the novels Exley and An Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England. His fiction and non-fiction have been included in a number of magazines, journals, newspapers, and anthologies, and have earned him an NEA Literature Fellowship, the Mary McCarthy Prize, and the Prairie Schooner Book Series Prize, among other awards.

 

lewisFor Lewis, roller derby represents some of her favorite things: women’s empowerment, Midwestern populism, spectacle and ambiguous sexuality.—Vox Talk

Congratulations to NER contributor Trudy Lewis on her new novel The Empire Rolls. Lewis’s work has appeared in Volumes 20.1, 21.3, and 25.1-2 of NER.

 

 

our-secret-life-in-movies-21We are particularly excited to announced that NER Associate Editor J. M. Tyree has published Our Secret Life in the Movies, a collection of stories in collaboration with Michael McGriff. Film scholars Tyree and McGriff present paired short stories inspired by selected works of film. Tyree’s previous book is BFI Film Classics: Salesman (British Film Institute, 2012). His work has appeared numerous times in NER, most recently in 30.4.

“Wildly intelligent and deeply felt, Our Secret Life in the Movies gives us a fascinating look at American life, shot through an insightful and compassionate lens. After reading it, the world seems bigger. A tremendous book.” —Molly Antopol, author of The UnAmericans

“Reading Our Secret Life in the Movies is like finding a lost frequency on the AM dial. The voices you hear in this book are strange, hypnotic, and intensely American.” —Jim Gavin, author of Middle Men

“A book of poignant and affecting beauty. Readers are presented with characters who are losing their innocence in lockstep with the changing nation they inhabit, and the end result is a book that provides great insight into both who we are and how we got this way. A remarkable achievement.” —Skip Horack, author of The Eden Hunter

Sheenan writes demigodshumorous and poetic prose-tales of everyday valor and agony set in the vast apartment complexes, spas, and car washes of 21st-century America. Library Journal

We are pleased to announce the release of NER author Aurelie Sheehan’s new book, a collection of short stories entitled Demigods on Speedway. Sheehan has published two collections of short stories, Jewelery Box: A Collection of Histories, and Jack Kerouac is Pregnant, as well as two novels, History Lessons for Girls, and The Anxiety of Everyday Objects. Her story Horse, Girl, Landscape, appeared in NER 26.3.

Announcing the new NER: Vol. 35, No. 3

Categories: News & Notes


THE NEW ISSUE OF NER HAS ARRIVED!

POETRY
C. Dale Young’s last issue as poetry editor presents 20 poems from his 20 years at NER, poems that he says “not only never left me alone but actually changed me as a reader and writer,” including works by Debora Greger, Brigit Pegeen Kelly, and Carl Phillips.

Agha Shahid Ali • Reginald Dwayne Betts • Jericho Brown • Gabrielle Calvocoressi • Victoria Chang • Jordan Davis • Geri Doran • Debora Greger • Jennifer Grotz • Laura Kasischke • Brigit Pegeen Kelly • Khaled Mattawa • Tomás Q. Morín • Matthew Olzmann • Carl Phillips • Paisley Rekdal • Natasha Trethewey • Ellen Bryant Voigt • G. C. Waldrep • David Yezzi

FICTION
Fiction writers Jonathan Durbin and Lenore Myka make their NER debut in this issue, and Brock Clarke, Dennis McFadden, and Christine Sneed return to our pages with stories of freedom and slavery, marriage, and a battle-axe. Also, an unforgettable story by Belgian author Kristien Hemmerechts appears for the first time in English.

Brock Clarke • Jonathan Durbin • Kristien Hemmerechts (trans. Margie Franzen & Sandra Boersma) • Peter LaSalle • Dennis McFadden • Lenore Myka • Christine Sneed

ESSAYS
The essays in this issue examine age and time, music and notoriety, the great American West, and the mutability of language and rock walls:

  • J. E. Uhl listens closely to the rhythm of New Orleans “Piano Wizard” James Booker
  • Robert Pogue Harrison unravels the question: how old are we, really?
  • Natasha Lvovich tallies the gains and losses of a language left behind
  • Vincent Czyz follows the bread-crumb trail of affinities
  • Elizabeth O’Brien, in praise of names, congruencies, and the letter Z
  • Alexandria Peary discovers the lives layered beneath our not-so-solid walls
  • Richard Tillinghast, out West on Wagonhound Road
  • Boris Sidis considers an epidemic of religious revival

COVER ART
Katherine Minott

Don’t miss this ambitious and unpredictable collection of writing—just published and now on its way from the printer.

See the full table of contents, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!

Our Authors: Updates, Awards and Selections

Categories: News & Notes

We are always excited to celebrate our NER authors, here are the most recent reasons to cheer:

PEN_lit_invite091214_WEBVictoria Chang‘s most recent book The Boss (McSweeney’s Poetry Series, 2013) has won the 2014 PEN Center USA Literary Award for poetry. Chang’s poems have appeared in several issues of NER (23.2, 24.3, 25.3, and 33.1), and are forthcoming in 35.3. Lindsay Hill won the 2014 PEN Center USA Literary Award for fiction, for his novel Sea of Hooks (McPherson & Co., 2013), excerpts of which were published in NER 34.2. Both will be awarded in a ceremony in LA on November 11.

 

let me see itCongratulations to NER author James Magruder for the selection of Let Me See It (Triquarterly, 2014) as Best Short Story Collection in Best of Baltimore 2014. He teaches dramaturgy at Swarthmore College and fiction at the University of Baltimore. His short story “Matthew Aiken’s Vie Bohème” appeared in NER 32.3.

 

 

 

mcarthur

Khaled Mattawa has been awarded the distinct honor of a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship. The Libyan-born poet and translator’s collections of poetry include Tocqueville (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2010) and Zodiac of Echoes (Ausable Press, 2003). He is an assistant professor in creative writing at the University of Michigan. The forthcoming issue of NER includes his poem “Borrowed Tongue,” and his work has appeared in our pages several time before (16.4, 17.4, and 21.2).

 

ben millerNER author Ben Miller will be lecturing at Harvard University on Wednesday, November 12 as part of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study 2014-2015 Fellows’ Presentation Series. Miller will discuss his memoir River Bend Chronicles, with special attention “to the role of spontaneity and sound in the depiction of consciousness under the boisterous pressure of memory.” His essay, “Village Bakery,” appears in 35.2 of NER.

 

 

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New Books for September from NER Authors

Categories: News & Notes

ohenryprize_0805_300_467_100We are pleased to announce that NER contributor Stephen Dixon’s story, “Talk,” will be featured in the new O. Henry Prize Stories. Dixon’s work appears in several issues of NER, most recently in 34.2.

Stephen Dixon is the author of thirty books of fiction, including His Wife Leaves Him (2013) and nominated National Book Award novels Frog (1991) and Interstate (1995). He has retired after teaching in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins for twenty-seven years and lives in Ruxton, Maryland.

 

entwined With her characteristic passionate impersonality, Carol Frost has written, over the years, this great book. —Reginald Gibbons

NER is pleased to announce Carol Frost’s twelfth collection of poetry, Entwined: Three Lyric Sequences (Tupelo Press). Her work has appeared in numerous Volumes of NER, the most recent being Volume 25.3.

Frost currently holds an endowed chair of English at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida.

 

“Sajohnsonra Eliza Johnson’s stunning, deeply visceral first collection, Bone Map (2013 National Poetry Series Winner), pulls shards of tenderness form a world on the verge of collapse . . .”

NER congratulates Sara Eliza Johnson on her first collection of poetry, Bone Map (Milkweed Editions). Johnson’s work appeared in Volume 29.4 of NER.

Garrett Hongo: “Bone Map charts a dreamscape that mixes elements of folk tale into mysterious itineraries through the commingled fringes of the world of sacramental animals and a frail humankind. . . . The logic in her narratives is that of dreaming—primitive, chthonic, and subtly terrifying. Hers is a cunning and dangerous poetry, deceptive in its apparent innocence, not written against the dark backdrop of identifiable horrors, but drawn from a well of the beautiful and the macabre, a crystal cup of roses dipped in the tongueblood of wolves. In all, there is a mystic vision of wintry things first seen at the cusp of spring, not yet sorted into any commonplace order. For Johnson is a builder of miraculous worlds and not their devourer.”

Martha Collins: “The territory mapped in this gorgeous book—first a forest with animals, then water and winter ice—is wracked by violence, war, and loss, with the bones and viscera of the living and dead laying claim to our attention. But it is also a world of dream and vision: ‘All moments will shine if you cut them open,’ the poet says. And though the process is often brutal, as war edges toward apocalypse, then quiets to elegiac ache, a fierce beauty emerges, line by line, image by image, transforming darkness as well as light.”

Sara Eliza Johnson is the winner of the National Poetry Series and Rona Jaffe award, and has published poems in Boston Review in addition to NER and other publiscations.  She is the Vice Presidential Fellow in creative writing at the University of Utah.

 

lasalle“LaSalle’s stories are subtle, evocative, haunting—and brilliantly written.” —Kirkus Starred Review

NER contributor Peter LaSalle has recently published his short story collection What I Found Out About Her: Stories of Dreaming Americans (University of Notre Dame 2014). The collection won the 2014 Richard Sullivan Prize in Short Fiction and includes a story originally published in NER. LaSalle’s work has appeared in several NER issues, most recently in 32.4, and has work forthcoming in 35.3.

“I’ve always believed that as a short story writer Peter LaSalle has been in the same class as Donald Barthelme and Joyce Carol Oates in the avant-garde of American fiction writers, and now, reading his new collection . . . I am more than confirmed in that belief: indeed, his sophisticated and highly controlled formal experimentation, which is the sparkling core of his style, now flows with such masterly ease that he can be said to be in a class of his own, at the forefront of American creators of original prose.” —Zulfikar Ghose, author of The Triple Mirror of the Self

“Peter LaSalle’s stories, set in wonderfully various settings . . . are rich in their delineation of our private lives and loves, and in those moments in which, by ourselves or with others, we live most deeply. These haunting tales are shrewdly original, disarmingly complex, and—always, always, since LaSalle is one of our finest storytellers—as beautifully crafted as they are memorable.” —Jay Neugeboren, author of You Are My Heart and Other Stories

 

41Lg5cefCZL“The book offers a delectable array of cognitive insights, ancient history, and Calvino’s indispensable voice.”

Martin McLaughlin‘s translation of Italo Calvino’s book, Collection of Sand: Essays has been published by HMH/Mariner. His translations of Calvino’s letters were featured under “Literary Lives” in NER 34.1.

From Publishers Weekly: “Museum exhibitions draw Calvino’s attention to the natural world, to the bizarre—and to the past. His subtle humor threads its way through staid descriptions of wax museums, automata, knots, and the ruins of a pig sty . . . Calvino’s travelogues, particularly those set in Japan, are the best example of his ability to capture the real world with the same vigor and verve as his imaginative fiction.”

Italo Calvino (1923–1985) was a distinguished Italian novelist and author of such books as Cosmicomics (1965), Invisible Cities (1972), and If on a winter’s night a traveler (1979). He was also an influential literary critic and editor.

Martin McLaughlin is the Agnelli-Serena Professor of Italian Studies at the University of Oxford. He is the translator of Italo Calvino’s Hermit in Paris: Autobiographical Writings, Into the War, and Why Read the Classics?, which won the John Florio Prize for translation. He is also co-translator of Calvino’s The Complete Cosmicomics.

 

onceinthewest“A searing new collection from one of our country’s most important poets”

Cheers to NER contributor Christian Wiman on the release of his fourth collection of poetry, Once in the West (Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2014). His poems have previously appeared in issues 21.1, 24.1, and 30.2.

From Publishers Weekly: “The first half of this harsh and sometimes masterful fourth outing . . . might represent the best verse he has yet penned….His search for religious answers twines itself tautly with reflections on his own illness, homages to the poets of the past, and exemplary self-scrutiny.”

From the publisher: “Christian Wiman’s fourth collection of poetry is as intense and intimate as poetry gets—from the “suffering of primal silence” that it plumbs to the “rockshriek of joy” that it achieves and enables. Readers of Wiman’s earlier books will recognize the sharp characterization and humor…as well as his particular brand of reverent rage….  But there is something new here, too: moving love poems to Wiman’s wife, tender glimpses of the poet’s children, and amid the onslaughts of illness and fear and failures, “a trace / of peace.”

Christian Wiman is the author of seven previous books, including memoirs and collections of poetry.  From 2003 to 2013 he was the editor of Poetry magazine.  Currently, he teaches religion and literature at the Yale Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School.

T. L. Khleif to Receive Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award

Categories: News & Notes

Jaffe-T.L.Khleif2We are pleased to announce that fiction writer and New England Review contributor T. L. Khleif will receive a 2014 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award, which is given annually to six writers who demonstrate excellence and promise in the early stages of their careers. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, the Rona Jaffe Awards have helped many women build successful writing careers by offering encouragement and financial support at a critical time. The Awards are $30,000 each and will be presented to the six recipients on September 18th in New York City.

T. L. Khleif received a BA from Brown University, an MA in Arab Studies from Georgetown University, and an MFA from the University of Michigan, where she is a lecturer. Her stories have appeared or are forthcoming in New England Review and the Normal School, and she is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony fellowship. Ms. Khleif is working on a novel tentatively titled The Absence of Layla Halabi, and will use her Writer’s Award to take time off from teaching to focus on this novel full time. 

In addition to T. L. Khleif, the 2014 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award recipients are Olivia ClareKaren Hays, Danielle Jones-Pruett, Mara Naselli, and Solmaz Sharif. Congratulations to them all from New England Review.

www.ronajaffefoundation.org.

Celebrated novelist Rona Jaffe (1931-2005) established The Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Awards program in 1995. It is the only national literary awards program of its kind dedicated to supporting women writers exclusively. Since the program began, the Foundation has awarded nearly $2 million to emergent women writers, including several who have gone on to critical acclaim, such as Elif Batuman, Eula Biss, Lan Samantha Chang, Rivka Galchen, Aryn Kyle, Rebecca Lee, ZZ Packer, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, Tracy K. Smith, Mary Szybist, and Tiphanie Yanique.

 

Announcing the new NER: Vol. 35, No. 2

Categories: News & Notes

Presenting a junk store of dreams, an island of dreams, a beautiful dreamer. Death by cancer, death by dismemberment, death by suicide bombing; also hearing loss and loads of loot; Calypso, Ozymiandas, wild turkeys, and Freud (and more Freud). Roaches (and more roaches), a cross-country cycling trip, Nicaragua in 1987, professorly love, and a porn epidemic (plus mermaids!). In other words, you won’t want to miss NER 35.2, just published and now on its way from the printer.

In poetry: NER welcomes Marcelo Hernandez Castillo, Matthew Lippman, January Gill O’Neil, April Ossmann, Christopher Robinson, and Wesley Rothman, and welcomes back Ash Bowen, Patricia Clark, Peter Cooley, Joanne Dominique Dwyer, Debora Greger, Bob Hicok, James Hoch, and Matthew Thorburn.

In fiction: NER welcomes Sands Hall, Jessica Langan-Peck, Lou Mathews, Goran Petrovic (trans. Peter Agnone), Sean Warren, and welcomes back Stephen Dixon.

In nonfiction and drama: John R. Nelson Watches E. B. White Watching Forbush Watch the Birds; Ben Miller, on Vigilance and Love Among the Roaches; Kate Lebo Surrenders to the Echo Inside Her Skull; James Naremore on the Passion and Precision of James Agee, Film Reviewer; Carl Phillips Goes Looking for the Ghosts that Haunt a Poem; Lucian Travels to the Island of Dreams, by Way of A. J. Church; Savyon Liebrecht Imagines the Fury Freud Left Behind

On the cover: Colorcode by Duncan Johnson

See the full table of contents, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!