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New Books for September from NER Authors

Categories: News & Notes

ohenryprize_0805_300_467_100We are pleased to announce that NER contributor Stephen Dixon’s story, “Talk,” will be featured in the new O. Henry Prize Stories. Dixon’s work appears in several issues of NER, most recently in 34.2.

Stephen Dixon is the author of thirty books of fiction, including His Wife Leaves Him (2013) and nominated National Book Award novels Frog (1991) and Interstate (1995). He has retired after teaching in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins for twenty-seven years and lives in Ruxton, Maryland.

 

johnson“Sara Eliza Johnson’s stunning, deeply visceral first collection, Bone Map (2013 National Poetry Series Winner), pulls shards of tenderness form a world on the verge of collapse . . .”

NER congratulates Sara Eliza Johnson on her first collection of poetry, Bone Map (Milkweed Editions). Johnson’s work appeared in Volume 29.4 of NER.

Garrett Hongo: “Bone Map charts a dreamscape that mixes elements of folk tale into mysterious itineraries through the commingled fringes of the world of sacramental animals and a frail humankind. . . . The logic in her narratives is that of dreaming—primitive, chthonic, and subtly terrifying. Hers is a cunning and dangerous poetry, deceptive in its apparent innocence, not written against the dark backdrop of identifiable horrors, but drawn from a well of the beautiful and the macabre, a crystal cup of roses dipped in the tongueblood of wolves. In all, there is a mystic vision of wintry things first seen at the cusp of spring, not yet sorted into any commonplace order. For Johnson is a builder of miraculous worlds and not their devourer.”

Martha Collins: “The territory mapped in this gorgeous book—first a forest with animals, then water and winter ice—is wracked by violence, war, and loss, with the bones and viscera of the living and dead laying claim to our attention. But it is also a world of dream and vision: ‘All moments will shine if you cut them open,’ the poet says. And though the process is often brutal, as war edges toward apocalypse, then quiets to elegiac ache, a fierce beauty emerges, line by line, image by image, transforming darkness as well as light.”

Sara Eliza Johnson is the winner of the National Poetry Series and Rona Jaffe award, and has published poems in Boston Review in addition to NER and other publiscations.  She is the Vice Presidential Fellow in creative writing at the University of Utah.

 

lasalle“LaSalle’s stories are subtle, evocative, haunting—and brilliantly written.” —Kirkus Starred Review

NER contributor Peter LaSalle has recently published his short story collection What I Found Out About Her: Stories of Dreaming Americans (University of Notre Dame 2014). The collection won the 2014 Richard Sullivan Prize in Short Fiction and includes a story originally published in NER. LaSalle’s work has appeared in several NER issues, most recently in 32.4, and has work forthcoming in 35.3.

“I’ve always believed that as a short story writer Peter LaSalle has been in the same class as Donald Barthelme and Joyce Carol Oates in the avant-garde of American fiction writers, and now, reading his new collection . . . I am more than confirmed in that belief: indeed, his sophisticated and highly controlled formal experimentation, which is the sparkling core of his style, now flows with such masterly ease that he can be said to be in a class of his own, at the forefront of American creators of original prose.” —Zulfikar Ghose, author of The Triple Mirror of the Self

“Peter LaSalle’s stories, set in wonderfully various settings . . . are rich in their delineation of our private lives and loves, and in those moments in which, by ourselves or with others, we live most deeply. These haunting tales are shrewdly original, disarmingly complex, and—always, always, since LaSalle is one of our finest storytellers—as beautifully crafted as they are memorable.” —Jay Neugeboren, author of You Are My Heart and Other Stories

 

41Lg5cefCZL“The book offers a delectable array of cognitive insights, ancient history, and Calvino’s indispensable voice.”

Martin McLaughlin‘s translation of Italo Calvino’s book, Collection of Sand: Essays has been published by HMH/Mariner. His translations of Calvino’s letters were featured under “Literary Lives” in NER 34.1.

From Publishers Weekly: “Museum exhibitions draw Calvino’s attention to the natural world, to the bizarre—and to the past. His subtle humor threads its way through staid descriptions of wax museums, automata, knots, and the ruins of a pig sty . . . Calvino’s travelogues, particularly those set in Japan, are the best example of his ability to capture the real world with the same vigor and verve as his imaginative fiction.”

Italo Calvino (1923–1985) was a distinguished Italian novelist and author of such books as Cosmicomics (1965), Invisible Cities (1972), and If on a winter’s night a traveler (1979). He was also an influential literary critic and editor.

Martin McLaughlin is the Agnelli-Serena Professor of Italian Studies at the University of Oxford. He is the translator of Italo Calvino’s Hermit in Paris: Autobiographical Writings, Into the War, and Why Read the Classics?, which won the John Florio Prize for translation. He is also co-translator of Calvino’s The Complete Cosmicomics.

 

onceinthewest“A searing new collection from one of our country’s most important poets”

Cheers to NER contributor Christian Wiman on the release of his fourth collection of poetry, Once in the West (Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2014). His poems have previously appeared in issues 21.1, 24.1, and 30.2.

From Publishers Weekly: “The first half of this harsh and sometimes masterful fourth outing . . . might represent the best verse he has yet penned….His search for religious answers twines itself tautly with reflections on his own illness, homages to the poets of the past, and exemplary self-scrutiny.”

From the publisher: “Christian Wiman’s fourth collection of poetry is as intense and intimate as poetry gets—from the “suffering of primal silence” that it plumbs to the “rockshriek of joy” that it achieves and enables. Readers of Wiman’s earlier books will recognize the sharp characterization and humor…as well as his particular brand of reverent rage….  But there is something new here, too: moving love poems to Wiman’s wife, tender glimpses of the poet’s children, and amid the onslaughts of illness and fear and failures, “a trace / of peace.”

Christian Wiman is the author of seven previous books, including memoirs and collections of poetry.  From 2003 to 2013 he was the editor of Poetry magazine.  Currently, he teaches religion and literature at the Yale Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School.

T. L. Khleif to Receive Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award

Categories: News & Notes

Jaffe-T.L.Khleif2We are pleased to announce that fiction writer and New England Review contributor T. L. Khleif will receive a 2014 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award, which is given annually to six writers who demonstrate excellence and promise in the early stages of their careers. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, the Rona Jaffe Awards have helped many women build successful writing careers by offering encouragement and financial support at a critical time. The Awards are $30,000 each and will be presented to the six recipients on September 18th in New York City.

T. L. Khleif received a BA from Brown University, an MA in Arab Studies from Georgetown University, and an MFA from the University of Michigan, where she is a lecturer. Her stories have appeared or are forthcoming in New England Review and the Normal School, and she is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony fellowship. Ms. Khleif is working on a novel tentatively titled The Absence of Layla Halabi, and will use her Writer’s Award to take time off from teaching to focus on this novel full time. 

In addition to T. L. Khleif, the 2014 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award recipients are Olivia ClareKaren Hays, Danielle Jones-Pruett, Mara Naselli, and Solmaz Sharif. Congratulations to them all from New England Review.

www.ronajaffefoundation.org.

Celebrated novelist Rona Jaffe (1931-2005) established The Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Awards program in 1995. It is the only national literary awards program of its kind dedicated to supporting women writers exclusively. Since the program began, the Foundation has awarded nearly $2 million to emergent women writers, including several who have gone on to critical acclaim, such as Elif Batuman, Eula Biss, Lan Samantha Chang, Rivka Galchen, Aryn Kyle, Rebecca Lee, ZZ Packer, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, Tracy K. Smith, Mary Szybist, and Tiphanie Yanique.

 

Announcing the new NER: Vol. 35, No. 2

Categories: News & Notes

Presenting a junk store of dreams, an island of dreams, a beautiful dreamer. Death by cancer, death by dismemberment, death by suicide bombing; also hearing loss and loads of loot; Calypso, Ozymiandas, wild turkeys, and Freud (and more Freud). Roaches (and more roaches), a cross-country cycling trip, Nicaragua in 1987, professorly love, and a porn epidemic (plus mermaids!). In other words, you won’t want to miss NER 35.2, just published and now on its way from the printer.

In poetry: NER welcomes Marcelo Hernandez Castillo, Matthew Lippman, January Gill O’Neil, April Ossmann, Christopher Robinson, and Wesley Rothman, and welcomes back Ash Bowen, Patricia Clark, Peter Cooley, Joanne Dominique Dwyer, Debora Greger, Bob Hicok, James Hoch, and Matthew Thorburn.

In fiction: NER welcomes Sands Hall, Jessica Langan-Peck, Lou Mathews, Goran Petrovic (trans. Peter Agnone), Sean Warren, and welcomes back Stephen Dixon.

In nonfiction and drama: John R. Nelson Watches E. B. White Watching Forbush Watch the Birds; Ben Miller, on Vigilance and Love Among the Roaches; Kate Lebo Surrenders to the Echo Inside Her Skull; James Naremore on the Passion and Precision of James Agee, Film Reviewer; Carl Phillips Goes Looking for the Ghosts that Haunt a Poem; Lucian Travels to the Island of Dreams, by Way of A. J. Church; Savyon Liebrecht Imagines the Fury Freud Left Behind

On the cover: Colorcode by Duncan Johnson

See the full table of contents, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!

Cheers to Best New Poets 2014!

Categories: News & Notes

1406596928486Congratulations to NER poet Wayne Johns for the selection of “Delirium” for the 2014 edition of Best New Poets. “Delirium” first appeared in NER 33.4.

Congratulations, as well, to all fifty emerging poets who will appear in this year’s anthology, NER contributors Richie Hofmann, C. L. O’Dell, and Jacques J. Rancourt among them!

Read the complete list of this year’s poets here. 

 

Rick Barot Named NER’s New Poetry Editor for Fall 2014

Categories: News & Notes

As many of our online readers already know, at the end of this summer NER’s poetry editor C. Dale Young will be leaving his post after nineteen years on our masthead. His last issue as poetry editor, due out in October, will feature 20 poems he selected over the years and highlight the range of work and joy of discovery he brought to the magazine. C. Dale began reading poetry for NER as a medical student in the mid-nineties, C-Dale-photo-2014continued on as associate editor, and then became poetry editor in 2000. We have been incredibly fortunate to have had such a passionate and discerning editor selecting work for our pages for so many years, and we salute C. Dale for his versatility, reliability, and dedication. We will miss him in ways we can’t yet imagine!

But we are equally fortunate to be able to announce that our new poetry editor will be Rick Barot. Rick is not only an accomplished poet but he is also a devoted reader and teacher of poetry with wide-ranging taste and vision. He served as a reader for NER for a number of years, in between publishing his poetry and essays in our pages. (Read his most recent essay, The Image Factory.) He begins as poetry editor in September.

Rick has published two books of poetry with Sarabande Books: The Darker Fall (2002), which received the Kathryn A. Morton Prize, and Want (2008), which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Artist Trust of Washington, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, and Stanford University, where he was a Wallace E. Stegner Fellow and a Jones Lecturer in Poetry. His poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications, including Poetry, The Paris Review, The New Republic, Ploughshares, Tin House, The Kenyon Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Threepenny Review. He lives in Tacoma, Washington, and teaches at Pacific Lutheran University, where he is also the director of The Rainier Writing Workshop, PLU’s low-residency MFA in creative writing. Sarabande will publish his third book of poems, Chord, in 2015.

We look forward to working with Rick in his new role, and to bringing our readers an ambitious and exciting selection of poetry in the issues to come.

NER Congratulates Victoria Chang

Categories: News & Notes

Commonwealth pic 1We are pleased to congratulate NER contributor Victoria Chang on being awarded a silver medal in the California Book Awards. The California Book Awards are among the oldest literary awards in the United States, and were one of the first to recognize the talent of John Steinbeck, who received three Gold Medals between 1935 and 1939.

UnknownChang was recognized for her new collection, The Boss (McSweeney’s Poetry Series), and is the first Asian-American poet to win an award in the organization’s long history. She is the author of two other books of poetry: Salvinia Molesta (2008) and Circle (2005), which won the Crab Orchard Review Open Competition Award. She has been featured in several issues of NER, most recently in 33.1.

Congratulations to Victoria!

 

Order a copy of The Boss from McSweeney’s.

Learn more about the 83-year-old California Book Awards: http://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/special-events/california-book-awards

Announcing the new NER: Vol. 35, No. 1

Categories: News & Notes

The new issue of NER has just been shipped from the printer, and a preview is available here on our website. A startling array of new voices is accompanied by new works from established authors, in this first issue from editor Carolyn Kuebler.

New poems by Elizabeth Spires, William Fargason, Troy Jollimore, David Hernandez, Kelli Russell Agodon, Rebecca Morgan Frank, Elizabeth T. Gray Jr., Carl Phillips, Rachel Richardson, Campbell McGrath, and Melissa Stein appear alongside new fiction from Glen Pourciau, Ricardo Nuila, Laura Lee Smith, David Guterson, Polly Rosenwaike, and Steven Heighton.

In essays, Jehanne Dubrow walks with Phillip Larkin, Francis-Noël Thomas examines Flemish painting, Rüdiger Safranski writes of Richard Wagner’s work to create a revolutionary “mythos,” Joshua Harmon takes us for a spin with the Cocteau Twins, Kathryn Kramer learns from her father in and out of the classroom, and Larry I. Palmer integrates the Phillips Exeter barbershop of the 1950s. Translations of prose by Valeria Luiselli, Juan José Saer, and Esther Tusquets reveal three very different Spanish-language authors from three countries, and cover artist Raïssa Venables contributes a photograph that disorients even as it invites readers inside.

See the full table of contents, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!

 

C. Dale Young Receives Award for Literary Editing

Categories: News & Notes

Dr. C. Dale Young, Poetry Editor of New England Review, is the recipient of the 2014 Stanley W. Lindberg Award for Literary Editing. This award is presented by the Rainier Writers Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University to someone who has labored to uphold the highest literary standards in a magazine or small press. It is given in honor of the late Stanley Lindberg, a well-known man of letters who brought The Georgia Review to national eminence. The award will be conferred at the annual residency of the Program in August.

Young works full-time as a physician and has been editing poetry at the New England Review for 19 years. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, he is the author of four collections of poetry, including Torn (2011) and The Halo (Four Way Books, 2016).

Young teaches part-time in the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers and lives in San Francisco. Poets published by Young very early in their careers include: Nick Flynn, Jennifer Grotz, Cate Marvin, Patrick Phillips, and the Poet Laureate of the United States Natasha Trethewey.

NER Congratulates 2014 Guggenheim Fellows

Categories: News & Notes

We are pleased to announce that NER contributor, Paisley Rekdal, has been awarded a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship!

paisley-rekdalRekdal is among 178 fellows chosen from an applicant pool of almost 3,000 individuals, and has previously received numerous honors for her poetic work including an NEA Fellowship and two Pushcart Prizes. She has published four books of poetry, appeared in Best American Poetry, and contributed to five issues of NER (26.4, 28.1, 29.4, 33.2, & 34.3-4).

Congratulations to Paisley and all of the other 2014 Guggenheim recipients!

 

http://www.gf.org/fellows/17662-paisley-rekdal

New England Review Announces Double Issue

Categories: News & Notes

Double Issue
Volume 34, Numbers 3–4

From the poetry of Derrick AustinPaisley Rekdal, and more than a dozen others, to the memorable stories of writers such as Leslie Bazzett and Charles Baxter, the new double issue of NER presents nearly 400 pages of new writing and translations that span two centuries.

In nonfiction, Rick Barot tells of becoming a poet in the years between undergraduate and graduate school in “The Image Factory” (“My poems could think, I was beginning to see…”), Steven Poole calls out deplorable office jargon in “The Favored Language of the Appararatchik: A Contemporary Sampler,” Jeff Staiger takes a long look at the impact of e-readers in “Kindle 451,” and much more.

Special Feature: The Russian Presence. With this rich offering of poetry and fiction, much of it in English for the first time, we are pleased to present twenty translations from Russian, including major Soviet era poets and contemporary poets, stories by Russian Booker Prize winners, and works by Dostoevsky and Chekhov. In addition: a reconsideration of an article written by Andrey Platonov during the Moscow Show Trials; a new, annotated translation of the transcript of the trial of poet Joseph Brodsky on the 50th anniversary of that event; an account of Lee Harvey Oswald’s pilgrimage to the USSR; Tomas Venclova’s memories of Anna Akhmatova; a detailed analysis of Andrey Tarkovsky’s film The Mirror; and playwright David Edgar’s reflections on language in eastern Europe after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Order a copy of the beautiful new issue today—or better yet, subscribe!