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“NER Out Loud” Brings the Page to the Stage

Categories: News & Notes, Readings

ner_35-2_front_cover-sqIn the tradition of Public Radio International’s “Selected Shorts,” Middlebury College students will read selections from the New England Review in a live performance entitled “NER Out Loud” at the Mahaney Center for the Arts Concert Hall on February 24, 7:30 p.m. The event will be followed by a “S’more Readings” reception with the readers and NER staff, along with representatives of several student literary magazines. Both events are free and open to the public. ASL interpreting provided.

Readers will include Kevin Benscheidt ’17, Brenna Christensen ’17, Caitlyn Duffy ’15.5, Cole Ellison ’17, Jabari Matthew ’17, Melissa MacDonald ’15, and Sally Seitz ’17, with Debanjan Roychoudhury ’16 as MC. Editors and contributors to the student literary magazines Sweatervest, Blackbird, and Room 404 will also be on hand at the post-show reception to discuss their publications and give sample readings from their pages. Attendees will be invited to enjoy s’mores while listening to the readings in the lobby.

NER Out Loud is the result of a new partnership between the Mahaney Center for the Arts, the Oratory Society, and the New England Review. NER Out Loud will take place on Tuesday, February 24, 2015, at 7:30 P.M. in the Concert Hall of the Kevin P. Mahaney ’84 Center for the Arts. The reception will take place in the downstairs lobby immediately following the performance. Admission is free and the public is welcome. The Mahaney Center is located at 72 Porter Field Road in Middlebury, just off Route 30 south, on the campus of Middlebury College. Free parking is available. For more information, call (802) 443-MIDD (6433) or go to http://go.middlebury.edu/arts.

Ricardo Nuila Wins NER Award for Emerging Writers

Categories: News & Notes

Ricardo NuilaIt is with enormous pleasure that New England Review and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference announce the selection of Ricardo Nuila as the recipient of the first annual New England Review Award for Emerging Writers.

Ricardo Nuila is a practicing doctor, professor, and writer. He teaches in the Medicine & Society program at the University of Houston Honors College and works as an attending physician at Baylor College of Medicine. His latest essay on the care of undocumented immigrants was featured in the Winter 2015 issue of VQR and subsequently on Longform.org; other essays have appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine. His fiction has appeared in New England Review, McSweeney’s, Zyzzyva, and Best American Short Stories 2011.

Nuila will attend the 2015 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference as the first New England Review Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Scholar. His story “At the Bedside” appears in NER 35.1. Please join us in wishing Ricardo Nuila congratulations.

Tarfia Faizullah Wins New Writers Award

Categories: News & Notes

Congratulations to NER author Tarfia Faizullah, winner of the 2015 Great Lakes Colleges Association’s New Writers Award in poetry for her new book Seam (Southern Illinois University Press)!

 

According to the GLCA judges:

Tarfia Faizullah’s Seam shimmers with exigent discovery. It looks back with the charge of the absolute present tense and gives voice to what must be named and claimed before the speaker, and the world, can move on. The speaker is a young woman compelled to make a pilgrimage along the seam between “Why call any of it back?” and “yes call it back/back again.” The poems interrogate history via intimate, spiraling, even delicate detail. I admire the way that Faizullah negotiates her authorial vexed position of reporting upon atrocities that both belong and do not belong to her. She recognizes her own position and interrogates it. From start to finish, Seam represents a harrowing act of empathy. As a book and project, this is so powerful, combining modes and formal approaches to explore this little-known part of history. The book is well-crafted and very relevant to our current age.

 

NER Releases Short List for Emerging Writers Award

Categories: News & Notes

New England Review announces, with enormous pleasure, the finalists for the first New England Review Emerging Writers Award.

DSC_3006Please join us in congratulating our six finalists for 2015:

Leslie Bazzett  (34.3-4)
Marcelo Hernandez Castillo  (35.2)
William Fargason  (35.1)
Ricardo Nuila  (35.1)
Larry I. Palmer  (35.1)
Sean Warren  (35.2)

The winner, to be announced later this month, will receive a scholarship to the 2015 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Congratulations to them all—we are proud to have published such strong work from emerging writers in all three genres.

 

New Books for February from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

Curtiss_smallweb-250x386“. . . an elegant chronicle of grief, of the sprawling bonds between brothers and sisters, of bodies in this world, of the power of language when so artfully arranged.” —Roxane Gay

Congratulations to poet Caleb Curtiss on the publication of his collection A Taxonomy of the Space Between Us (Black Lawrence Press, 2015). Curtiss’s work appeared in NER Volume 33.1. His poetry has also been published in a number of literary journals including the Literary Review, PANK, and Hayden’s Ferry Review. He teaches high school English in Champaign, Illinois.

 

 

crow-work2We are pleased to announce the publication of Crow-Work (Milkweed Editions, 2015), the latest collection of poetry from NER author Eric Pankey. Pankey is the author of ten collections of poems, the first of which, The New Year (Atheneum, 1984), earned him the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. His 2013 collection, Dismantling the Angel (Parlor Press, 2013), received the New Measure Prize. Pankey’s poem, “The Weight of Yesterday” appears in NER 34.1.

“Eric Pankey is a poet of precise observation and startling particularities. His wisdom, sometimes sidelong, sometimes direct, both knows and feels. The soundcraft is superb, the modes of investigation by turns lyrical, surreal, meditative, allegorical, direct-speaking, and allusive.” —Jane Hirshfield

 

NER congratulates contributor Quan Barry on the release of her fiction debut, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born (Pantheon, 2015), a novel of modern Vietnam as experienced through the eyes of a young girl born just years before the country’s unification. Barry is the author of four poetry books, including the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry winner Water Puppets, and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry, and her work has appeared in such publications as Ms. and the New Yorker. Barry’s poem, “Lion,” appeared in NER 27.2.

“. . . lyrical, luminous, and suspenseful all at once. Rabbit’s experience of wartime and reconciliation in Vietnam is one that I haven’t yet encountered in fiction, and it is rendered with shocking clarity and pathos on the page.” —Jesmyn Ward, National Book Award-winning author of Salvage the Bones

 

there's something

It is our pleasure to announce the release of contributor Charles Baxter‘s collection of ten stories, There’s Something I Want to Tell You (Pantheon, 2015). Including five stories named for virtue and five for vice, one of the selections from the compilation, “Sloth,” appeared in NER 34.3-4, and his work has also appeared in NER 27.4 and 15.1. Baxter’s third novel, The Feast of Love, was a finalist for the 2000 National Book Award. Baxter’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic, New York Review of Books, and Harper’s, among other journals and magazines. His fiction has been anthologized in Best American Short Stories seven times, eleven times in The Pushcart Prize Anthology, and translated into many languages.

An audio excerpt of Baxter reading from There’s Something I Want to Tell You at the 2014 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference is available here.

“Bare storylines can’t convey the quickly captivating simple narratives . . . or the revealing moments to which Baxter brings the reader. . . Similarly, Baxter, a published poet, at times pushes his fluid, controlled prose to headier altitudes. Nearly as organic as a novel, this is more intriguing, more fun in disclosing its connective tissues through tales that stand well on their own.” —Kirkus Reviews, *starred review*

 

New Books for the New Year from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

coffey“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —Jay Parini, Middlebury College D. E. Axinn Professor of English & Creative Writing and author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station

NER congratulates contributor Michael Coffey on his first collection of short stories, The Business of Naming Things (Bellevue Literary Press, 2015), which includes his story “Sons,” originally published in NER 34.1. Coffey’s essay “Waiting for Nauman” has appeared in our online NER Digital series, as well.

Publisher’s Weekly: There is no conventional narrative here… This collection which features first-, second-, and third-person narration, is vibrant and unsparing.

Edmund White, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own Story: “Michael Coffey brings us so close to his subjects it is almost embarassing. Whether he’s writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?

Michael Coffey has published three books of poems, a book about baseball’s perfect games, and co-edited a book about Irish immigration to America. He is a former co-editorial director of Publishers Weekly.

 

watch me go“Mark Wisniewski has constructed a fabulous noir that touches on the third-rail of American life and the inside rail at the track. His voice is down-to-earth and sharp, delivering swift, salty pages concerning murder and jails, justice and damaged souls.”—Daniel Woodrell, PEN Award winner and Edgar-nominated author of Winter’s Bone

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Wisniewski‘s newest novel, Watch Me Go (Penguin Putnam). His story “Karmic Vapor” appeared in NER 25.1.

Mark Wisniewski has published two novels, Show Up, Look Good and Confessions of a Polish Used Car Salesman. His stories have appeared in a number of publications including Southern Review and Antioch Review.

“The pure, muscular story-telling of Mark Wisniewski’s Watch Me Go made it irresistible.”New York Times bestselling author Salman Rushdie

 

muldoonCongratulations to NER contributor Paul Muldoon on the publication of his newest book of poetry, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). Muldoon, originally from Ireland, is Howard G. B. Clark ’21 Professor at Princeton University and poetry editor of the New Yorker. His most recent collections are Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Horse Latitudes (2006), and Maggot (2010). His essays on Fernando Pessoa, Emily Dickinson and Seamus Heaney have appeared in NER 23.4, 24.2, and 34.2, respectively.

“. . . another wild, expansive collection from the eternally surprising Paul Muldoon, 2003 winner and poetry editor at the New Yorker. ‘Watchfulness’ is the buzzword surrounding this one, and it seems as great a place as any to start the 2015 reading year.” —Publisher’s Weekly

 

sandoperaIt is with pleasure that we announce the release of NER contributor Philip Metres‘s newest poetry collection, Sand Opera (Alice James, 2015), an exploration of war in the modern age through examinations of the Abu Ghraib prison, childhood perspectives, and the role of the US government. Metres is the author of A Concordance of Leaves, abu ghraib arias, To See the Earth, Behind the Lines: War Resistance Poetry on the American Homefront Since 1941, and other books. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry and has garnered numerous awards, including two NEA fellowships, four Ohio Arts Council Grants, the Arab American Book Award, and a 2014 Creative Workforce Fellowship. He teaches literature and creative writing at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Metres’s translations from Russian were published in NER 34.3-4, and his poetry has appeared in 22.3, 23.4, and 25.4.

“Phil Metres transforms our prostrate sorrow and gracious rage against the banal evil of the administered world into aria and opera.” —Fady Joudah, author of Alight and The Earth in the Attic

 

Announcing NER 35.4

Categories: News & Notes

 THE NEW ISSUE OF NER HAS ARRIVED!

POETRY
Rick Barot
‘s inaugural issue as poetry editor introduces twelve poets who have never before published with NER. We welcome Rick and his poets, and the exactitude and joy he brings to these pages.

Luke Brekke Kevin Craft Andrew Grace • Ela Harrison • Joanna Klink • Joan Larkin • Michelle Peñaloza • Patrick Rosal • Richard Siken • Austin Smith • Arthur Sze • Eleanor Wilner

FICTION
Fiction writers Allegra Hyde and Susan Engberg make their NER debut alongside returning NER authors Matthew Baker, Castle Freeman Jr., and William Gilson, with stories of shark fishing, squirrel trouble, and a Sensei gone on the lam. 

Matthew Baker • Susan Engberg • Castle Freeman Jr. • William Gilson • Allegra Hyde

ESSAYS
The essays in this issue range from a struggle to say hello to the struggle to say goodbye, and in between reach out to a family’s past, a nation’s past, and a literary past. 

  • Elizabeth Kadetsky investigates the ether of her family’s imagined past
  • Kelly Grey Carlisle solves for X
  • Philip F. Gura reignites the reputation of an early Native American orator
  • Norman Mailer reads and writes the twentieth century
  • Chris Nelson articulates the stuttering of Neil Young’s guitar
  • Laurence de Looze loses himself in the enchanted alleyways of the Alfama
  • John Cowper Powys presents the “best books,” 1916
  • Bill Johnston translates the story of everyone’s old family dog by Polish author Andrzej Stasiuk

COVER ART
Margaret Withers

Don’t miss this ambitious and unpredictable collection of writing—just published.

See the full table of contents, and order a copy today. Or better yet, subscribe!

NER + NEA = More Support for Writers

Categories: News & Notes

NEA-logo-color-e1320093807889New England Review is delighted to announce that we’ve won the support of the National Endowment for the Arts for 2015 through an Art Works grant. In 2014 we were able to double our payment to writers for the print journal—the first increase in 20 years—and because of this grant we’ll be able to continue paying this higher rate through the next volume. But this year we’re going to do even better: beginning in 2015 we will pay contributors to NER Digital, our feature of original writing for the web. Up until now writers have been gracious enough to allow their work to be published there for the gift of a subscription to NER, but now we’ll be able to pay them an honorarium in cold hard cash as well. We’d like to thank associate editor J. M. Tyree for his dedication to the NER Digital project—for masterminding the idea and building it through its first years.

The NEA’s fellowships for writers, which in 2015 will be awarded to 36 poets, will honor a number of NER contributors. Congratulations to all who earned a place on the list this year, including Sean Hill (NER Digital), Eliot Khalil Wilson (29.4), Kerry James Evans (30.2), Anders Carlson-Wee (forthcoming, 36.1), Sara Eliza Johnson (29.4), Shara Lessley (33.1), and Melissa Range (34.1).

2015 Pushcart Prize

Categories: News & Notes

2015CoverHomeCongratulations to all of this year’s Pushcart Prize winners. This year’s anthology has just been released, and we’re particularly pleased to note the inclusion of NER authors Tarfia Faizullah (“The Streetlamp Above Me Darkens“), as a recipient of the award, and Michael Coffey (NER 34.1), for special mention in fiction.

New Books for November from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, News & Notes


brocke-clarke
Clarke dazzles with a dizzying study in extremes, cruising at warp speed between bleak and optimistic, laugh-out-loud funny and unbearable sadness. His comedy of errors is impossible to put downPublishers Weekly

Brock Clarke has published his new book, The Happiest People in the World. Clarke’s work has appeared in several issues of NER, most recently in the current issue and 33.1.

Clarke is the author of five works of fiction, including the novels Exley and An Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England. His fiction and non-fiction have been included in a number of magazines, journals, newspapers, and anthologies, and have earned him an NEA Literature Fellowship, the Mary McCarthy Prize, and the Prairie Schooner Book Series Prize, among other awards.

 

lewisFor Lewis, roller derby represents some of her favorite things: women’s empowerment, Midwestern populism, spectacle and ambiguous sexuality.—Vox Talk

Congratulations to NER contributor Trudy Lewis on her new novel The Empire Rolls. Lewis’s work has appeared in Volumes 20.1, 21.3, and 25.1-2 of NER.

 

 

our-secret-life-in-movies-21We are particularly excited to announced that NER Associate Editor J. M. Tyree has published Our Secret Life in the Movies, a collection of stories in collaboration with Michael McGriff. Film scholars Tyree and McGriff present paired short stories inspired by selected works of film. Tyree’s previous book is BFI Film Classics: Salesman (British Film Institute, 2012). His work has appeared numerous times in NER, most recently in 30.4.

“Wildly intelligent and deeply felt, Our Secret Life in the Movies gives us a fascinating look at American life, shot through an insightful and compassionate lens. After reading it, the world seems bigger. A tremendous book.” —Molly Antopol, author of The UnAmericans

“Reading Our Secret Life in the Movies is like finding a lost frequency on the AM dial. The voices you hear in this book are strange, hypnotic, and intensely American.” —Jim Gavin, author of Middle Men

“A book of poignant and affecting beauty. Readers are presented with characters who are losing their innocence in lockstep with the changing nation they inhabit, and the end result is a book that provides great insight into both who we are and how we got this way. A remarkable achievement.” —Skip Horack, author of The Eden Hunter

Sheenan writes demigodshumorous and poetic prose-tales of everyday valor and agony set in the vast apartment complexes, spas, and car washes of 21st-century America. Library Journal

We are pleased to announce the release of NER author Aurelie Sheehan’s new book, a collection of short stories entitled Demigods on Speedway. Sheehan has published two collections of short stories, Jewelery Box: A Collection of Histories, and Jack Kerouac is Pregnant, as well as two novels, History Lessons for Girls, and The Anxiety of Everyday Objects. Her story Horse, Girl, Landscape, appeared in NER 26.3.