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Midweek Break | Peter Ho Davies Reads at Bread Loaf

Categories: Audio, NER Community

2006 smiling photoPeter Ho Davies reads his short story “What You Know” at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

“What You Know”

Peter Ho Davies is the author of the novel The Welsh Girl and the story collections The Ugliest House in the World and Equal Love. His work has appeared in Harpers, Atlantic Monthly, and Paris Review, among others, and his short fiction has been anthologized in Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards and Best American Short Stories. In 2003 Granta magazine named him among its “Best of Young British Novelists,” and he was a 2008 recipient of the Pen/Malamud Prize for excellence in the short story. Born in Britain to Welsh and Chinese parents, Davies now lives in the US. He teaches in the MFA Program at the University of Michigan.

All Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference readings are available on iTunesU. To hear more, please visit the Bread Loaf website.

New Books for May from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

 

The most moving and expansive poet to come out of the American Midwest since 9780393246124_198James Wright.”

New England Review congratulates David Baker on the publication of his new book of poetry, Scavenger Loop (W. W. Norton & Company). Baker is an NER author with poetry forthcoming in NER 36.2.

Baker’s latest work layers the natural history of his beloved Midwest and traces the “complex history of human habitation, from family and village life to the evolving nature of work and the mysterious habitats of the heart.”

David Baker is the author of Never-Ending Birds and several other collections, and has won awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Ohio Arts Council, Poetry Society of America, Society of Midland Authors, and the Pushcart Foundation. He is editor of the Kenyon Review and teaches at Denison University.

 Purchase this book at W.W. Norton & Company or at independent booksellers.

 

riverhouseCongratulations to NER contributor Sally Keith on the publication of her newest collection, River House (Milkweed Editions, 2015), which features poems of absence written after the loss of her mother. Keith is the author of The Fact of the Matter and two previous collections of poetry, Design and Dwelling Song. She is a faculty member of the MFA program at George Mason University and lives in Washington, DC. Keith’s poem “Song from the Rain” appeared in NER 24.4, and two  poems, “In the Desert Near . . .” and “What heavenward gesture . . . ” in NER 33.2. In addition, her essay “The Spirit of the Beehive” appeared as an original New England Review Digital piece in our ongoing series, Confluences.

“. . . when you’re finished reading, your dream comes true: you can read the poems again.  I do not know of a book of poems that embodies more heartbreakingly or more intelligently the experience of irreconcilable loss.” —James Longenbach, author of The Iron Key

Purchase River House at Milkweed Editions or at independent booksellers. 

 

testament_bookstore“Waldrep offers us his most necessary book, one that asks us that question we fear ourselves to ask: how is this real, any of it, all of it, faith, language, light, history, and that cipher that collects them all, the human heart?” —Dan Beachy-Quick

We are pleased to announce the publication of G. C. Waldrep‘s latest work, Testament (BOA Editions, 2015). From the publisher: A book-length poem, Testament addresses matters as diverse as Mormonism, cymatics, race, Dolly the cloned sheep, and his own life and faith. Drafted over twelve trance-like days while in residence at Hawthornden Castle, Waldrep . . . tackles the question of whether gender can be a lyric form. Intimately autobiographical, Waldrep’s fifth book masterly takes its own place in the American tradition of the long poem.

Waldrep’s most recent poems in New England Review include “What David Taught and Where He Taught It” (NER 34.3-4) and “Their Faces Shall Be As Flames” (NER 35.3). The recipient of multiple awards, Waldrep teaches at Bucknell University, is editor for the literary journal West Branch, and editor-at-large for Kenyon Review.

Purchase Testament at BOA Editions, Ltd. or at independent booksellers. 

 

Russian_Poetry“An enchanting collection of the very best of Russian poetry.” — Penguin Classics

NER congratulates Robert Chandler and Boris Dralyuk on their new anthology The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry (edited with poet Irina Mashinski, Penguin Classics, 2015). From the publisher: This anthology traces Russian poetry from its Golden Age to the modern era, including work by several great poets—Georgy Ivanov and Varlam Shalamov among them—in captivating modern translations.

Chandler and Dralyuk’s translations and writings have appeared in the special section “The Russian Presence” of New England Review‘s double issue 34.3-4. Chandler is a poet and translator of many works of Russian literature and teaches part time at Queen Mary, University of London. Dralyuk is a lecturer in Russian at the University of St. Andrews and translator of many books from Russian.

Purchase The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry from Penguin Classics or an independent bookseller. 

  “A new book of poems—or of anything—by Mark Doty is good news in a dark time. The precision, daring, scope, elegance of his compassion and of the language in which he embodies it are a reassuring pleasure.” —W. S. Merwin

 

9780224099837-1-edition.default.original-1We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Doty‘s newest collection of poems Deep Lane (Norton 2015). From Publisher’s Weekly: “Having gained renown for his self-consciously beautiful, heart-on-sleeve elegies, Doty remains elegiac and continues to attend to beauty. He also does some of his best work yet as a nature poet.”

Mark Doty’s work appears in NER volumes 13.3-4, 31.2, and 32.1. He has published eight volumes of poetry, and his collection Fire to Fire won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. Doty’s work has also received numerous honors including the National Book Critics Circle Award and fellowships from the Guggenheim and the National Endowment for the Arts. He is a professor and writer-in-residence at Rutgers University.

Purchase Deep Lane at W. W. Norton & Company or at independent booksellers.

 

New England Review congratulates contributor Lauren Acampora on her debut novel, The Wonder Garden (Grove, 2015). Acampora creates a portrait of a Connecticut suburb through a collection of linked stories that wonder garden coverPublisher’s Weekly calls “intelligent, unnerving, and very often strange.”

From the publisher: “A keen and brilliant observer of the strangeness that is American suburbia. Acampora joins the ranks of writers like John Cheever and Tom Perrotta in her incisive portrait of lives intersecting in one Connecticut town . . . Deliciously creepy and masterfully choreographed, The Wonder Garden heralds the arrival of a phenomenal new talent in American fiction.”

Lauren Acampora’s fiction has appeared in NER 27.3 as well as NER Digital, Paris ReviewMissouri ReviewPrairie Schooner, and Antioch Review. 

Purchase The Wonder Garden from Grove Atlantic or at independent booksellers.

 

“A brace and necessary set of early flares of the literary imagination into the Panopticon we all find ourselves living inside these days.” — Jonathan Lethem

We are excited to announce the publication of Watchlist (OR Books 2015), a collection of short stories about surveillance society edited by NER contributor Bryan Hurt.

Hurt’s work appears in NER 33.2 as well as in American Reader, Kenyon Review, and Tin House, and many others. He has published a novel, Everyone Wants to Be Ambassador to France, and is the winner of the Starcherone Prize for Innovative Fiction.

Purchase Watchlist at OR Books or at independent booksellers.

Midweek Break | Jennine Capó Crucet Reads at Bread Loaf

Categories: Audio, NER Community

jccrucetJennine Capó Crucet reads a passage from her novel Magic City Relic at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of How to Leave Hialeah, winner of the Iowa Short Fiction Award, the John Gardner Book Prize, and the Devil’s Kitchen Award in Prose. A recipient of an O. Henry Prize and a Bread Loaf Fellow, her work has appeared in Virginia Quarterly Review, Ploughshares, Epoch, Southern Review, Crazyhorse, Gulf Coast, and other magazines. After working in South Central LA as a counselor to first-generation college students, she is now an assistant professor at Florida State University.

All Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference readings are available on iTunesU. To hear more, please visit the Bread Loaf website.

Midweek Break | Justin Torres Reads at Bread Loaf

Categories: Audio, NER Community

SUB-BOOK-AUTHOR-articleInline-v2Justin Torres reads an excerpt from his novel We the Animals at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

“We Wanted More”

Justin Torres’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, Granta, Tin House, Glimmer Train, and other publications. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and previously a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford and a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. One of the National Book Foundation’s 2012 5 Under 35s, he is a recipient of the Rolón United States Artist Fellowship in Literature, a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts, and the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award. He teaches at Columbia University, Lesley University’s Low Residency MFA Program, and The Writers’ Foundry MFA Program at St. Joseph’s College.

All Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference readings are available on iTunesU. To hear more, please visit the Bread Loaf website.

Midweek Break | Melinda Moustakis Reads at Bread Loaf

Categories: Audio, NER Community

melind_3__1Melinda Moustakis reads at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Her story, “What You Can Endure,” appears in NER 32.1.

Bear Down Bear North: Alaska Stories

Melinda Moustakis was born in Fairbanks, Alaska, and raised in California. Her debut collection, Bear Down Bear North: Alaska Stories (University of Georgia Press, 2011) won the Flannery O’ Connor Award in Short Fiction and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Her story “They Find the Drowned” won a PEN/O.Henry award.

Her work has also appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Kenyon Review, Conjunctions, American Short Fiction, and elsewhere. She was named a 5 Under 35 writer by the National Book Foundation and was a Hodder Fellow at The Lewis Center of the Arts at Princeton University. She received a 2014 National Endowment of the Arts Literature Fellowship and is a 2014-2016 Kenyon Review Fellow in Fiction at Kenyon College.

All Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference readings are available on iTunesU. To hear more, please visit the Bread Loaf website.

New Books for February from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

Curtiss_smallweb-250x386“. . . an elegant chronicle of grief, of the sprawling bonds between brothers and sisters, of bodies in this world, of the power of language when so artfully arranged.” —Roxane Gay

Congratulations to poet Caleb Curtiss on the publication of his collection A Taxonomy of the Space Between Us (Black Lawrence Press, 2015). Curtiss’s work appeared in NER Volume 33.1. His poetry has also been published in a number of literary journals including the Literary Review, PANK, and Hayden’s Ferry Review. He teaches high school English in Champaign, Illinois.

 

 

crow-work2We are pleased to announce the publication of Crow-Work (Milkweed Editions, 2015), the latest collection of poetry from NER author Eric Pankey. Pankey is the author of ten collections of poems, the first of which, The New Year (Atheneum, 1984), earned him the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. His 2013 collection, Dismantling the Angel (Parlor Press, 2013), received the New Measure Prize. Pankey’s poem, “The Weight of Yesterday” appears in NER 34.1.

“Eric Pankey is a poet of precise observation and startling particularities. His wisdom, sometimes sidelong, sometimes direct, both knows and feels. The soundcraft is superb, the modes of investigation by turns lyrical, surreal, meditative, allegorical, direct-speaking, and allusive.” —Jane Hirshfield

 

NER congratulates contributor Quan Barry on the release of her fiction debut, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born (Pantheon, 2015), a novel of modern Vietnam as experienced through the eyes of a young girl born just years before the country’s unification. Barry is the author of four poetry books, including the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry winner Water Puppets, and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry, and her work has appeared in such publications as Ms. and the New Yorker. Barry’s poem, “Lion,” appeared in NER 27.2.

“. . . lyrical, luminous, and suspenseful all at once. Rabbit’s experience of wartime and reconciliation in Vietnam is one that I haven’t yet encountered in fiction, and it is rendered with shocking clarity and pathos on the page.” —Jesmyn Ward, National Book Award-winning author of Salvage the Bones

 

there's something

It is our pleasure to announce the release of contributor Charles Baxter‘s collection of ten stories, There’s Something I Want to Tell You (Pantheon, 2015). Including five stories named for virtue and five for vice, one of the selections from the compilation, “Sloth,” appeared in NER 34.3-4, and his work has also appeared in NER 27.4 and 15.1. Baxter’s third novel, The Feast of Love, was a finalist for the 2000 National Book Award. Baxter’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic, New York Review of Books, and Harper’s, among other journals and magazines. His fiction has been anthologized in Best American Short Stories seven times, eleven times in The Pushcart Prize Anthology, and translated into many languages.

An audio excerpt of Baxter reading from There’s Something I Want to Tell You at the 2014 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference is available here.

“Bare storylines can’t convey the quickly captivating simple narratives . . . or the revealing moments to which Baxter brings the reader. . . Similarly, Baxter, a published poet, at times pushes his fluid, controlled prose to headier altitudes. Nearly as organic as a novel, this is more intriguing, more fun in disclosing its connective tissues through tales that stand well on their own.” —Kirkus Reviews, *starred review*

 

Seattle’s Hugo House Hosts NER

Categories: NER Community, Readings

Wednesday, January 28 at 7PM

A release party for NER Volume 35.4 will occur at the Hugo House in Seattle! Poetry editor Rick Barot will emcee, and copies of his inaugural issue will be available. Readers include NER contributors Kelli Russell Agodon, Kevin Craft, Susan Rich, Christopher Robinson, and Michelle Peñaloza.

NER poetry editor Rick Barot has publishRick Baroted two books of poetry with Sarabande Books: The Darker Fall (2002), and Want (2008), which won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Artist Trust of Washington, the Civitella Ranieri, and Stanford University, where he was a Wallace E. Stegner Fellow and a Jones Lecturer. His third collection, Chord, will be published by Sarabande in 2015. 


 

Kelli Russell Agodon

Kelli Russel Agodon is an award-winning poet, writer, and editor from the Pacific Northwest. Her most recent collection is Hourglass Museum (White Pine Press, 2014) and The Daily Poet: Day-By-Day Prompts for Your Writing Practice, which she coauthored with Martha Silano. Her second collection, Letters from the Emily Dickinson Room was chosen by Carl Dennis for the winner of the White Pine Press Book Prize, and was also the Winner of ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year in Poetry as well as a Finalist for the Washington State Book Prize.

 

Kevin CraftKevin Craft is the editor of Poetry Northwest. His books include Solar Prominence (Cloudbank Books, 2005), and five volumes of the anthology Mare Nostrum, an annual collection of Italian translation and Mediterranean-inspired writing. New poems have appeared recently in Poetry, Kenyon Review, Collagist, and New England Review. He lives in Seattle, and directs both the Written Arts Program at Everett Community College and the University of Washington’s Creative Writing Summer in Rome Program.

 

Michelle Penaloza

Michelle Peñaloza grew up in Nashville, Tennessee. Her poetry has appeared most recently in Asian American Literary Review, TriQuarterly, Oversound, Pinwheel, and INCH. She is the recipient of fellowships and awards from the University of Oregon, Kundiman, Artist Trust, Jack Straw, Hugo House, and Literary Arts. Her chapbook, landscape / heartbreak, is forthcoming from Two Sylvias Press in Spring 2015.

 

 

Susan Rich

Susan Rich is the author of four collections of poems: Cloud Pharmacy, The Alchemist’s Kitchen, Cures Include Travel, and The Cartographer’s Tongue /Poems of the World. She has received fellowships and awards from Artists Trust, the Times Literary Supplement, PEN USA, and the Fulbright Foundation. Susan’s poems have appeared in many journals including Alaska Quarterly Review, Gettysburg Review, Harvard Review, and New England Review. She is co-founder of Poets on the Coast: A Writing Retreat for Women and the new Seattle reading series WordsWest.

 

Christopher Robinson

Christopher Robinson’s debut novel, War of the Encyclopaedists, co-authored with Gavin Kovite, will be published by Scribner in May 2015. His work has appeared in Missouri Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Kenyon Review, McSweeney’s Online, and elsewhere. He is a recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, and the Djerassi Resident Artist program, among others. He earned his MA in poetry from Boston University and his MFA from Hunter College. His secret underground lair is located somewhere in Seattle.

New Books for the New Year from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

coffey“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —Jay Parini, Middlebury College D. E. Axinn Professor of English & Creative Writing and author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station

NER congratulates contributor Michael Coffey on his first collection of short stories, The Business of Naming Things (Bellevue Literary Press, 2015), which includes his story “Sons,” originally published in NER 34.1. Coffey’s essay “Waiting for Nauman” has appeared in our online NER Digital series, as well.

Publisher’s Weekly: There is no conventional narrative here… This collection which features first-, second-, and third-person narration, is vibrant and unsparing.

Edmund White, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own Story: “Michael Coffey brings us so close to his subjects it is almost embarassing. Whether he’s writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?

Michael Coffey has published three books of poems, a book about baseball’s perfect games, and co-edited a book about Irish immigration to America. He is a former co-editorial director of Publishers Weekly.

 

watch me go“Mark Wisniewski has constructed a fabulous noir that touches on the third-rail of American life and the inside rail at the track. His voice is down-to-earth and sharp, delivering swift, salty pages concerning murder and jails, justice and damaged souls.”—Daniel Woodrell, PEN Award winner and Edgar-nominated author of Winter’s Bone

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Wisniewski‘s newest novel, Watch Me Go (Penguin Putnam). His story “Karmic Vapor” appeared in NER 25.1.

Mark Wisniewski has published two novels, Show Up, Look Good and Confessions of a Polish Used Car Salesman. His stories have appeared in a number of publications including Southern Review and Antioch Review.

“The pure, muscular story-telling of Mark Wisniewski’s Watch Me Go made it irresistible.”New York Times bestselling author Salman Rushdie

 

muldoonCongratulations to NER contributor Paul Muldoon on the publication of his newest book of poetry, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). Muldoon, originally from Ireland, is Howard G. B. Clark ’21 Professor at Princeton University and poetry editor of the New Yorker. His most recent collections are Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Horse Latitudes (2006), and Maggot (2010). His essays on Fernando Pessoa, Emily Dickinson and Seamus Heaney have appeared in NER 23.4, 24.2, and 34.2, respectively.

“. . . another wild, expansive collection from the eternally surprising Paul Muldoon, 2003 winner and poetry editor at the New Yorker. ‘Watchfulness’ is the buzzword surrounding this one, and it seems as great a place as any to start the 2015 reading year.” —Publisher’s Weekly

 

sandoperaIt is with pleasure that we announce the release of NER contributor Philip Metres‘s newest poetry collection, Sand Opera (Alice James, 2015), an exploration of war in the modern age through examinations of the Abu Ghraib prison, childhood perspectives, and the role of the US government. Metres is the author of A Concordance of Leaves, abu ghraib arias, To See the Earth, Behind the Lines: War Resistance Poetry on the American Homefront Since 1941, and other books. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry and has garnered numerous awards, including two NEA fellowships, four Ohio Arts Council Grants, the Arab American Book Award, and a 2014 Creative Workforce Fellowship. He teaches literature and creative writing at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Metres’s translations from Russian were published in NER 34.3-4, and his poetry has appeared in 22.3, 23.4, and 25.4.

“Phil Metres transforms our prostrate sorrow and gracious rage against the banal evil of the administered world into aria and opera.” —Fady Joudah, author of Alight and The Earth in the Attic

 

Howard Altmann reads “Desert Sounds”

Categories: NER Community

Howard Altmann reads his poem “Desert Sounds” for Slate Magazine. The poem appears on their website in its written and audio form.

 

Howard Altmann’s poems “As a Light Snow Keeps Falling” and “Solitude” both appear in New England Review Volume 33, No. 3. A Montreal native, Altmann now lives in New York City.

 

New Books for October from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

gallaher. . . as he struggles to understand the meaning of family, love, and death, Gallaher addresses life questions in a way that few poets of his generation have been willing to risk.—BOA Editions

We are pleased to announce the publication of In a Landscape (BOA Editions), a book-length poem by NER contributor John Gallaher. His poem “Your Lover, Later” was featured in 30.1 and “In a Landscape: VI” first appeared in 33.2.

“Reading these poems is like listening in on the thoughts of a brilliant mind at work on unsolvable, often existential, problems, the poet always peering outward, toward a landscape of autobiography and memory that ‘goes on all night, dotted with little fires.'” —Kevin Prufer, author of National Anthem

John Gallaher is the author of The Little Book of Guesses (Four Way, 2007), Map of the Folded World (University of Akron Press, 2009), and Your Father on the Train of Ghosts (BOA Editions Ltd., 2011), co-written with G. C. Waldrep. He currently teaches at Northwest Missouri State University and co-edits the Laurel Review.

 

a selected history of her heart.pdf. . . a collision of bodies, cultures, opportunity and motive, innocence and experience that layers a coming-of-age story into a multi-cultural background.Martha Collins, author of White Papers

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Carole Simmons Oles’s most recent collection of poetry, A Selected History of Her Heart (University of New Mexico Press, 2014). Her poem “Travel With the Missing” was featured in 20.3.

“These powerhouse poems reach out generation to generation with generosity and compassion. These poems invite us in, offer food and drink and shelter.”—Peggy Shumaker, author of Gnawed Bones.

Carole Simmons Oles has authored eight other collections of poetry, including The Deed: Poems (Louisiana State University Press, 1991) and Waking Stone: Inventions on the Life of Harriet Hosmer (University of Arkansas Press, 2006).

 

howard-progressive-education-coverPropelled by layers of allusion and irony, Howard’s account of the children is a comedy with a plot. Howard gained fame for verse in the voices of literary and historical characters, often very sophisticated ones: the sixth-graders here are as much fun as any characters in any poetry this year, even as their improbably long senteces ask, seriously, “how the system we’re trying / to live by operates.”—Publishers Weekly

MacArthur Grant recipient, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner, and NER author Richard Howard has published his most recent book of poetry, A Progressive Education (Turtle Point). Garnering from his own school days, Howard uses the voices of children at a Cleveland private school to probe serious questions with irony and wit. Howard’s poem “Eidyia: An Interview” was featured in NER 27.1.

“It seems to me that, in the voices of L. Frank Baum, Wallace Stevens, and a whole cast of others, Richard has been working toward these fifth graders all along, minds bent on creative engagement with knowledge but able to stave off, for the span of their youth, for the span of a poem, an excess of hopelessness, which damns all art and life. Richard’s work in and on behalf of poetry is, precisely, an antidote to hopelessness.”—Craig Morgan Teicher for the Los Angeles Review of Books