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Bruce Snider Reads at Bread Loaf

Categories: Audio, NER Community

Bruce Snider reads two of his poems from his book Paradise, Indiana at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference on August 21, 2012.

Snider2-1

“Map”

“The Smoke”

Snider is the author of Paradise, Indiana, winner of the 2011 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Poetry Prize, and The Year We Studied Women, winner of the Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry. His poems have appeared in the Best American Poetry, American Poetry Review, PoetryPloughshares, and Gettysburg Review. He was a Wallace Stegner fellow, a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, and a Jenny McKean Moore Fellow at George Washington University. He currently teaches at the University of San Francisco.

All Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference readings are available on iTunesU. To hear more, please visit the Bread Loaf website.

NER Reunion Reading 2014

Categories: NER Community, Readings
Langdon Cook, Emily Raabe, Benjamin Ehrlich, Kristen Lindquist, Michael Collier

Langdon Cook, Emily Raabe, Benjamin Ehrlich, Kristen Lindquist, Michael Collier

NER was pleased to host its fifth annual Reunion reading on Saturday, June 7, with Michael Collier, Langdon Cook, Benjamin Ehrlich, Kristen Lindquist, and Emily Raabe. A crowd of more than 60 came in from the sun to hear about mushroom hunters, lost islands, furniture scrounged from the street, the lure of Red Sox radio, and the sometimes tiresome use of birdsong. Read more about these writers and their books.

New Books for June from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

guterson

“… the boundless potential of everyday encounters.”

We congratulate NER contributor David Guterson on the publication of his newest collection of stories, Problems with People (Knopf). We are proud to have recently published his stories “Tenant” (NER 33.3) and “Feedback” (NER 35.1).

From Publisher’s Weekly: “People struggle to connect with each other in this succinct but ambitious collection of 10 stories from the author of Snow Falling on Cedars.”

David Guterson is the author of five novels: Snow Falling on Cedars (winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award), East of the MountainsThe OtherOur Lady of the ForestSeattle Post-Intelliger, and Ed King; and a story collection, The Country Ahead of Us, the Country Behind. He is also a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship.

 

978-0-8101-5244-1-frontcover“…stories so alight with lust and danger and longing and loss…”

We are pleased to announce Triquarterly Books’ publication of Let Me See It, the newest collection of short stories from NER contributor James Magruder. His short story “Matthew Aiken’s Vie Bohème” appears in NER 32.3.

Author of The Wonder Bread Summer, Jessica Anya Blau: “Let Me See It overflows with honesty, hilarity, and heart. It’s impossible not to love this book, impossible to turn away from its brilliant prose, wicked humor, and utterly engaging characters.”

James Magruder, author of the novel Sugarless, is also a playwright and award-winning translator. He teaches dramaturgy at Swarthmore College and fiction at the University of Baltimore.

 

9780812993967_custom-d846708e56eebe6d09a303e84047536cbd3f9b93-s2-c85…a vivid and often amusing portrait of the New York’s Upper East Side literary scene…

Congratulations to David Gilbert on the paperback publication of his novel, & Sons (Random). Gilbert is a 1990 graduate of Middlebury College, and read his work at a tribute event for NER hosted by Middlebury’s Potomac Theatre Project in 2012.

From The New York Times literary critic Michiko Kakutani: “A contemporary New York variation on The Brothers Karamazov, featuring a J. D. Salinger–like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford’s classic The Good Soldier . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy, and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters’ memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail.”

David Gilbert is the author of the story collection Remote Feed and the novel The Normals. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, GQ, and Bomb.

These books can be purchased from Powell’s Books and independent booksellers. 

June 7: NER’s Middlebury Alumni and Faculty Reading

Categories: NER Community, Readings

New England Review is pleased to present a gathering of alumni and faculty authors during Middlebury’s reunion weekend on Saturday, June 7, at 2:30 p.m. Michael Collier, director of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference; Langdon Cook ’89; Benjamin Ehrlich ’09; Kristen Lindquist ’89; and Emily Raabe ’94 will read from their work in Middlebury College’s Axinn Center, Room 229.

michael-collier-448Michael Collier, director of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, has published six books of poems, including The Ledge, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and, most recently, An Individual History. With Charles Baxter and Edward Hirsch, he edited A William Maxwell Portrait. He has received an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Guggenheim Foundation and Thomas Watson Foundation fellowships, and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships. Poet Laureate of Maryland from 2001–2004, he teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Maryland and lives in Maryland and Cornwall, Vermont.

Cook_photoLangdon Cook ’89 is a writer, instructor, and lecturer on wild foods and the outdoors. His books include The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America, winner of the 2014 Pacific Northwest Book Award, and Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager, which the Seattle Times called lyrical, practical and quixotic.” His writing appears in numerous publications, and he has been profiled in Bon AppetitOutside, Salon.com, and the PBS TV series Food Forward. He lives in Seattle with his wife and two children. At Middlebury, he studied writing with Jay Parini, John Elder, and David Bain.

ben-brainBenjamin Ehrlich ’09 lives in New York City, where he is a coordinating volunteer at Word Up, a bilingual community bookshop and arts space in Washington Heights. His byline has appeared in The Forward, and he contributed writing and editing to Sensation: The New Science of Physical Intelligence, released this year by Simon & Schuster. He is a contributing editor for The Beautiful Brain, an online magazine for art and neuroscience, and a participating member of NeuWrite, a collaborative group for scientists and writers sponsored by Columbia University. He is now at work on a biography of Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852–1934), “the father of modern neuroscience,” some of whose writings he has translated from the original Spanish and published in New England Review. He is a staff writer for Covered With Fur, an online nonfiction magazine forthcoming from the Austin-based publisher A Strange Object, involving fellow Middlebury ’09 alums. He graduated from Middlebury in Literary Studies.

LindquistKristen Lindquist ’89 works for a land trust in her hometown of Camden, Maine. She received her MFA in poetry from the University of Oregon and enjoyed many summers at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Her poetry and other writings have appeared in Down East Magazine, Maine Times, Bangor Metro, Northern Sky News,and Bangor Daily News, as well as various literary journals and anthologies. Her publications include the chapbook Invocation to the Birds (Oyster River Press) and the book Transportation (Megunticook Press), which was a finalist for a Maine Literary Award. Garrison Keillor has read three poems from her book on National Public Radio’s The Writer’s Almanac. An avid birder, she has written a natural history column for the local paper for many years and maintains a daily haiku blog, Book of Days.

em in colorEmily Raabe ’94 lives in New York City with her husband, the filmmaker Paul Devlin. Her book of poems, Leave It Behind, was a runner-up for the 2011 FutureCycle First Book Award, and her novel Lost Children of the Far Islands was published by Knopf in April 2014. She is also the author of a monograph on the work of the sculptor Lawrence LaBianca, and her poetry has appeared in periodicals including Marlboro Review, Big Ugly Review, Indiana Review, Diner, Chelsea, Alaska Quarterly Review, Gulf Coast, Crab Orchard Review, Antioch Review, AGNI,and Eleven Eleven. She has received fellowships from the Macdowell Colony, the Ragdale Foundation, Rotary International, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She graduated from Middlebury with a BA in English and is currently a candidate for the PhD in English at CUNY.

 

New Books for May from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

413IG2ug3HL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Hypnotic as it is profound

We are pleased to announce that NER contributor Norman Lock‘s new novel, The Boy in His Winter, is out from Bellevue Literary Press. His most recent story for NER, “A Theory of the Self,” appears in 34.2.

Pulitzer-Prize winning author, Gilbert King: In this surreal and otherworldly river journey through time, Norman Lock transports Huck Finn down the Mississippi and deep into America’s history—and future. Elegant and imaginative, The Boy in His Winter is a tale that’s as hypnotic as it is profound.”

Norman Lock is a recipient of a fellowship from the New Jersey Council on the Arts, saw his play The House of Correction revived in Istanbul, and published a new collection of stories, Love Among the Particles, featuring three pieces of fiction originally published in New England Review.

 

9781556594663_p0_v1_s260x420Mythical sea beasts, loads of laundry, and high school athletics 

Congratulations to NER contributor Laura Kasischke on the publication of her newest collection of poems, The Infinitesimals (Copper Canyon Press). Laura Kasischke’s poetry first appeared in NER 16.1 in 1994, and most recently in NER 32.4.

Publisher’s Weekly describes Kasischke’s latest work: “Mythical sea beasts, loads of laundry, and high school athletics all populate Kasischke’s rich imagination.”

Laura Kasischke is currently the Allan Seager Collegiate Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. She is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for her book Space, in Chains (Copper Canyon) and has recently been honored by the Michigan Library Association with the 2013 Michigan Author Award.

 

9780544074811_p0_v2_s260x420A story of second chances

We are pleased to announce Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s publication of Wonderland, the newest novel from NER contributor Stacey D’Erasmo. Her essay “Influence: A Practice in Three Wanders” appears in issue 31.4.

Publisher’s Weekly calls this “A story of second chances . . . meticulously crafted. . . .”

Stacey D’Erasmo is the recipient of a 2009 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in Fiction. Her essays, features, and reviews have appeared in the New York Times Magazine,  New York Times Book ReviewBoston ReviewBookforum, and Ploughshares, among other publications.

 

As much prayer as it is poetrySamaras

NER is pleased to congratulate Nicholas Samaras on the recent publication of his newest collection of poetry American Psalm, World Psalm (Ashland Poetry Press). His poetry has been published in NER several times since 1994, and his most recent contributions (“Approach” / “At Night”) appear in 28.3.

From The Daily Beat News Blog: “Samaras … has reinvented modern poetry with this groundbreaking book … The poet combines a sense of morality that is virtually unmatched with a concrete abstraction reminiscent of the likes of a Pablo Neruda.”

Nicholas Samaras’s first book, Hands of the Saddlemaker, was selected for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1992. His poems have appeared in the New Yorker, Poetry, New Republic, Kenyon Review, and elsewhere. In 1997, he was a recipient of the National Endowment of the Arts Poetry Fellowship.

New Books from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

Poetry, Translation and a “Stunning Debut”

mad farmer coverNER author Wendell Berry has reissued his collection of poetry, The Mad Farmer Poems, with Counterpoint Press.

“. . . Mindful of time and earth, of joy and love, Berry calls us to the hard work of a hope and peace and gratitude so incarnate that they rest ‘on the ground underfoot.’”—Christian Century

Wendell Berry is an essayist, novelist, and poet, and has been awarded the T. S. Eliot Award, the Aiken Taylor Award for poetry, and the John Hay Award of the Orion Society. His poetry is featured in early issues of NER, and his essay “Why I Am Not Going to Buy a Computer” was published in NER 10.1.

 

roget's illusion cover“surprising delicacy and . . . language rich with insight”

Acclaimed poet Linda Bierds has published Roget’s Illusion, with Marian Wood Books/Putnam.

“Bierds’s poems, with their constantly surprising delicacy and their language rich with insight and a sensuous music, radiate real power and authority and animal presence.”—W.S. Merwin (Poet Laureate, 2010-12)

Linda Bierds is the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, including the MacArthur Foundation fellowship, the PEN West Poetry Prize, and two National Endowment for the Arts grants. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker,  Atlantic,  Kenyon Review and many others. Five of her poems were published in NER 24.4 and 31.1.

 

Screen Shot 2013-12-09 at 10.13.13 AM“disquieting, beautiful, upsetting, and exacting”

NER author Rebecca Cook has published a new book of poems, I Will Not Give Over, with Aldrich Press.

“The greatest quality of the prose poems in I Will Not Give Over is the one quality a writer can’t beg, borrow, or steal: they are genuine. They are disquieting, beautiful, upsetting, and exacting. Here, ‘Love shows up first dressed in fear.’ These are poems playing for keeps.”—Sue William Silverman, author of Hieroglyphics in Neon

Rebecca Cook is a 2009 Bread Loaf Scholar and her essay “Flame” was a notable essay in the 2013 Best American Essays. She is the author of The Terrible Baby, and her poems have been featured in numerous journals, including Antioch Review and Massachusetts Review. Her story “You Girls Have the Loveliest Legs” was published in NER 29.2.

 

9781936747559“A stunning debut”

Joanne Dominique Dwyer‘s first collection of poetry, Belle Laide, has been published by Sarabande Books.

From Dana Levin, author of Sky Burial: “Harems, mechanical bulls, Christina the Astonishing: Dwyer’s first book, Belle Laide, is a tour de force of verse; you never know where the next turn will take you. A vivid amalgamation of dream, association, and researched material, the poems sacrifice no depth of feeling in their wild meditations on the phenomenal world; or what it means to be a person—and a woman—in our contemporary moment. A stunning debut.”

Dwyer is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and a Bread Loaf Scholar award. Her poetry has been featured in NER several times, most recently in NER 34.1.

 

beans“Richly textured and wonderfully evocative … Undeniably original”

NER translator Bill Johnston has published a new book by Wiesław Myśliwski, translated from the Polish, with Archipelago Books. Johnston’s translation of Witold Gombrawicz’s story “The Rat” appeared in NER 25.1-2.

“Like a more agrarian Beckett, a less gothic Faulkner, a slightly warmer Laxness . . . Richly textured and wonderfully evocative . . . Undeniably original.” Publishers Weekly

“Sweeping . . . irreverent . . With winning candor . . . Pietruszka chronicles the modernization of rural Poland and celebrates the persistence of desire.” —The New Yorker

Bill Johnston’s previous translation of Wiesław Myśliwski’s book, Stone Upon Stone, won the PEN Translation Prize, 2012, the Best Translated Book Award 2012: Fiction, and the AATSEEL Translatino Award, 2012. He has translated numerous books and stories from the Polish.

Books can be ordered from Powell’s Books or your independent bookseller.  

 

 

New Books from NER Authors: Rachel Cantor

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

“Rife with deadpan humor and memorable characters”

Rachel Cantor’s new novel, A Highly Unlikely Scenario, has been published by Melville House.

A Highly Unlikely Scenario cover photoFrom the New York Times: “By layering the ridiculous inventions of her mind with the ridiculous facts of the world, Cantor creates a novel about being incredulous and certain at the same time, about listening without judgment, about acting on faith . . . A dystopian satire; a story about ­storytelling, believing and listening—A Highly Unlikely Scenario is ultimately a history of our own strange world.”

From Publisher’s Weekly: “Rife with deadpan humor and memorable characters mixed with time travel and supernatural powers, Cantor suspends disbelief and creates a loony world entirely of her own, which is terrifically funny and effortlessly enjoyable.”

Rachel Cantor’s stories have appeared in Paris ReviewKenyon ReviewFence, and other publications. Her fiction has been featured in several issues of NER (20.4, 23.3, 24.4, and 29.4).

A Highly Unlikely Scenario is available from Melville House and other independent booksellers.

NER Classics | Pimone Triplett

Categories: NER Classics, NER Community

Pimone Triplett’s poem, “Bird of Paradise Aubade
With Bangkok Etching Over the Bed,” appeared in NER 22.2.

“. . . your body’s parse of sweat and salt . . .”
VultureonaSpade1805

               Woke to hear you refuse
to stop working in heavy rain, shoveling the mud
that beggars our part
                             of the yard. After a while, I heard the rasp of iron’s
rake on gravel, wet earth, your bending for the gaps
to get the seedlings right. Then for hours from the window

               I watched all your muscles connecting up, your body’s parse
of sweat and salt, hollows
between the ribs appearing, then not, around your
                              breath’s steady reed and thrum. Watched,
you see, until I knew, for once, I wouldn’t try to leave.
Though I did want to walk out and say something else 

              about moving through the myth
of ask and answer once. 

[read more]

New Titles from NER Authors: Robert Pack

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

to-love-that-well-new-selected-1954-2013Robert Pack, a former DIrector of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference (1973–95), Middlebury College Professor (1964–96), and Consulting Editor for NER (1982–83), celebrates six decades of his work with the publication of New & Selected Poems • 1954–2013. “One finds a poignancy and a sorrow, laced always with a profound sense of humor, on page after
page . . .”—Paul Mariani

Pack continues to explore his major themes of family and friendship, the natural world, and art and music. “Pack, as always, exhibits a technical mastery that has all but disappeared from recent poetry. His meters are relaxed, creating an unusual suppleness and ease in his anecdotal narratives. This is an exceptionally readable book. The story poems are deeply moving, filled with great tenderness, charm, and wit.”—Mark Strand

Robert Pack held the Chair of Distinguished Faculty Professor of Literature and Creative Writing at Middlebury College where he taught for over thirty years, served as the Director of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference from l973 to 1994, and also taught at Middlebury’s graduate school of English, The Bread Loaf School, for over three decades. He the the author of numerous books of poetry, most recently Laughter Before Sleep (University of Chicago Press, 2011), Still Here, Still Now (University of Chicago Press, 2009), and a book of essays, Willing to Choose (Lost Horse Press, 2007).

To Love That Well (Lost Horse Press, 2013) can be ordered through www.washington.edu/uwpress or your independent bookseller.

NER Congratulates NEA Fellowship Winners

Categories: NER Community, News & Notes

NEA-logo-color-e1320093807889Congratulations to the 38 writers who were awarded Creative Writing Fellowships from the National Endowment of the Arts this year, each receiving an award of $25,000.

Two of these writers recently published stories in NER: Rebecca Makkai’s story “The Briefcase” was featured in 29.2, and Melinda Moustakis published “What You Can Endure” in 32.1. The Fellowships will give these writers an opportunity to “set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement.” Congratulations!