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New Books for May from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

 

The most moving and expansive poet to come out of the American Midwest since 9780393246124_198James Wright.”

New England Review congratulates David Baker on the publication of his new book of poetry, Scavenger Loop (W. W. Norton & Company). Baker is an NER author with poetry forthcoming in NER 36.2.

Baker’s latest work layers the natural history of his beloved Midwest and traces the “complex history of human habitation, from family and village life to the evolving nature of work and the mysterious habitats of the heart.”

David Baker is the author of Never-Ending Birds and several other collections, and has won awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Ohio Arts Council, Poetry Society of America, Society of Midland Authors, and the Pushcart Foundation. He is editor of the Kenyon Review and teaches at Denison University.

 Purchase this book at W.W. Norton & Company or at independent booksellers.

 

riverhouseCongratulations to NER contributor Sally Keith on the publication of her newest collection, River House (Milkweed Editions, 2015), which features poems of absence written after the loss of her mother. Keith is the author of The Fact of the Matter and two previous collections of poetry, Design and Dwelling Song. She is a faculty member of the MFA program at George Mason University and lives in Washington, DC. Keith’s poem “Song from the Rain” appeared in NER 24.4, and two  poems, “In the Desert Near . . .” and “What heavenward gesture . . . ” in NER 33.2. In addition, her essay “The Spirit of the Beehive” appeared as an original New England Review Digital piece in our ongoing series, Confluences.

“. . . when you’re finished reading, your dream comes true: you can read the poems again.  I do not know of a book of poems that embodies more heartbreakingly or more intelligently the experience of irreconcilable loss.” —James Longenbach, author of The Iron Key

Purchase River House at Milkweed Editions or at independent booksellers. 

 

testament_bookstore“Waldrep offers us his most necessary book, one that asks us that question we fear ourselves to ask: how is this real, any of it, all of it, faith, language, light, history, and that cipher that collects them all, the human heart?” —Dan Beachy-Quick

We are pleased to announce the publication of G. C. Waldrep‘s latest work, Testament (BOA Editions, 2015). From the publisher: A book-length poem, Testament addresses matters as diverse as Mormonism, cymatics, race, Dolly the cloned sheep, and his own life and faith. Drafted over twelve trance-like days while in residence at Hawthornden Castle, Waldrep . . . tackles the question of whether gender can be a lyric form. Intimately autobiographical, Waldrep’s fifth book masterly takes its own place in the American tradition of the long poem.

Waldrep’s most recent poems in New England Review include “What David Taught and Where He Taught It” (NER 34.3-4) and “Their Faces Shall Be As Flames” (NER 35.3). The recipient of multiple awards, Waldrep teaches at Bucknell University, is editor for the literary journal West Branch, and editor-at-large for Kenyon Review.

Purchase Testament at BOA Editions, Ltd. or at independent booksellers. 

 

Russian_Poetry“An enchanting collection of the very best of Russian poetry.” — Penguin Classics

NER congratulates Robert Chandler and Boris Dralyuk on their new anthology The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry (edited with poet Irina Mashinski, Penguin Classics, 2015). From the publisher: This anthology traces Russian poetry from its Golden Age to the modern era, including work by several great poets—Georgy Ivanov and Varlam Shalamov among them—in captivating modern translations.

Chandler and Dralyuk’s translations and writings have appeared in the special section “The Russian Presence” of New England Review‘s double issue 34.3-4. Chandler is a poet and translator of many works of Russian literature and teaches part time at Queen Mary, University of London. Dralyuk is a lecturer in Russian at the University of St. Andrews and translator of many books from Russian.

Purchase The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry from Penguin Classics or an independent bookseller. 

  “A new book of poems—or of anything—by Mark Doty is good news in a dark time. The precision, daring, scope, elegance of his compassion and of the language in which he embodies it are a reassuring pleasure.” —W. S. Merwin

 

9780224099837-1-edition.default.original-1We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Doty‘s newest collection of poems Deep Lane (Norton 2015). From Publisher’s Weekly: “Having gained renown for his self-consciously beautiful, heart-on-sleeve elegies, Doty remains elegiac and continues to attend to beauty. He also does some of his best work yet as a nature poet.”

Mark Doty’s work appears in NER volumes 13.3-4, 31.2, and 32.1. He has published eight volumes of poetry, and his collection Fire to Fire won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. Doty’s work has also received numerous honors including the National Book Critics Circle Award and fellowships from the Guggenheim and the National Endowment for the Arts. He is a professor and writer-in-residence at Rutgers University.

Purchase Deep Lane at W. W. Norton & Company or at independent booksellers.

 

New England Review congratulates contributor Lauren Acampora on her debut novel, The Wonder Garden (Grove, 2015). Acampora creates a portrait of a Connecticut suburb through a collection of linked stories that wonder garden coverPublisher’s Weekly calls “intelligent, unnerving, and very often strange.”

From the publisher: “A keen and brilliant observer of the strangeness that is American suburbia. Acampora joins the ranks of writers like John Cheever and Tom Perrotta in her incisive portrait of lives intersecting in one Connecticut town . . . Deliciously creepy and masterfully choreographed, The Wonder Garden heralds the arrival of a phenomenal new talent in American fiction.”

Lauren Acampora’s fiction has appeared in NER 27.3 as well as NER Digital, Paris ReviewMissouri ReviewPrairie Schooner, and Antioch Review. 

Purchase The Wonder Garden from Grove Atlantic or at independent booksellers.

 

“A brace and necessary set of early flares of the literary imagination into the Panopticon we all find ourselves living inside these days.” — Jonathan Lethem

We are excited to announce the publication of Watchlist (OR Books 2015), a collection of short stories about surveillance society edited by NER contributor Bryan Hurt.

Hurt’s work appears in NER 33.2 as well as in American Reader, Kenyon Review, and Tin House, and many others. He has published a novel, Everyone Wants to Be Ambassador to France, and is the winner of the Starcherone Prize for Innovative Fiction.

Purchase Watchlist at OR Books or at independent booksellers.

New Books by NER Authors for April

Categories: NER Authors' Books

Series-India-front-cover “Gray possesses a fine poetic intelligence, as humble and compassionate as it is keen.” 

NER congratulates Elizabeth T. Gray, Jr. on the publication of her book of poetry Series | India (Four Way Books).

From her publisher: “The poems in Series | India explore the rich borderlands between the familiar and the foreign, illumination and opacity, gods and charlatans, through the braided, sometimes unstable narratives of young Westerners in India.”

Poems and translations of Ms. Gray’s have been published or are forthcoming in Little Star, Kenyon Review Online, Poetry International, Harvard Review, New Orleans Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, and other publications. She is a translator of Persian and Tibetan literature, and has published her translations in several publications including Iran: Poems of Dissent (2013) and King Kesar of Ling (2012). Gray has also published a book of her translations called The Green Sea of Heaven: Fifty Ghazals from the Diwan-i Hafiz-i Shirazi (1995).

Series | India can be purchased from Four Way Books and independent booksellers.

 

 

 “His territory is [where] passion and eloquence collide and fuse.”
—The New York Times

New England Review is pleased to announce the publication of 51c--Jy36qL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_NER contributor Richard Siken‘s newest book of poetry, War of the Foxes (Copper Canyon 2015). This collection of poems features careful meditations that lead to questions of being, knowing, and power.

Siken’s work appears in NER 35.4. His debut collection, Crush, was the winner of the 2004 Yale Series of Younger Poets prize and a Lambda Literary Award.

Find War of the Foxes at Copper Canyon Press or at independent booksellers.

 

 

“Graham is one of our great poets. Her words will long outlast all of this chatter” —The New York Times

NER commends Jorie Graham on the publication of her second volume of selected poems From the New World: Poems 1976–2014 (Ecco 2015). y450-293

From the New York Times: “Graham’s great body of work, summarized in “From the New World,” her new career-spanning selected poems (one can understand why active poets resist the tombstone of a “collected” volume), has so much in it, more of life and of the world than that of almost any other poet now writing.”

Graham is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including Hybrids of Plants and Ghosts (1980), Erosion (1983), The End of Beauty (1987), Region of Unlikeness (1991), Never (2002), Sea Change (2008), and Place (2012), among others. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 2006 for her first volume of selected poems, The Dream of the Unified Field: Selected Poems 1974-1992.

From the New World is available at Ecco Press or at independent booksellers.

 

 

“A dazzling collection of essays on how the best poems work, from the master poet and essayist”

NER is pleased to announce to publication of New England Review contributor Jane Hirshfield’s collection of essays Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World (Knopf 2015).

From the publisher: “‘Poetry,’ Jane Hirshfield has said, ‘is language that foments coverrevolutions of being.’ In ten eloquent and highly original explorations, she unfolds and explores some of the ways this is done—by the inclusion of hiddenness, paradox, and surprise; by a perennial awareness of the place of uncertainty in our lives; by language’s own acts of discovery.”

Hirshfield’s work has appeared in several issues of New England Review including NER 21.2 and NER 25.4. Poems of Hirshfield’s have also been published in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the Times Literary Supplement, the Nation, New Republic, Harper’s, Orion, and American Poetry Review, among others. She is the author of seven previous collections of poetry, two books of essays, and four books collecting and co-translating the work of poets from the past.

Purchase Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World from Knopf or at independent booksellers.

 

 

“Hirshfield’s riddling recipes for that world offer a profoundly altered understanding of our lives’ losses and additions, and of the small and larger beauties we so often miss.”

It is also our pleasure to announce the publication of The Beauty (Knopf 2015), the latest collection of poetry from NER author Jane Hirshfield.

cover-2From Publishers Weekly (starred review): “The book pleads itself to remember the past; the moments where days drifted by and doors could open or close. It pleads not to be forgotten. If Hirshfield’s previous work could be accused of lacking duende, this one surely cannot; it is a book of late-midlife koans that finally only want one thing, for ‘fate to be human'”

Purchase The Beauty from Knopf or at independent booksellers. 

New Books for February from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

Curtiss_smallweb-250x386“. . . an elegant chronicle of grief, of the sprawling bonds between brothers and sisters, of bodies in this world, of the power of language when so artfully arranged.” —Roxane Gay

Congratulations to poet Caleb Curtiss on the publication of his collection A Taxonomy of the Space Between Us (Black Lawrence Press, 2015). Curtiss’s work appeared in NER Volume 33.1. His poetry has also been published in a number of literary journals including the Literary Review, PANK, and Hayden’s Ferry Review. He teaches high school English in Champaign, Illinois.

 

 

crow-work2We are pleased to announce the publication of Crow-Work (Milkweed Editions, 2015), the latest collection of poetry from NER author Eric Pankey. Pankey is the author of ten collections of poems, the first of which, The New Year (Atheneum, 1984), earned him the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. His 2013 collection, Dismantling the Angel (Parlor Press, 2013), received the New Measure Prize. Pankey’s poem, “The Weight of Yesterday” appears in NER 34.1.

“Eric Pankey is a poet of precise observation and startling particularities. His wisdom, sometimes sidelong, sometimes direct, both knows and feels. The soundcraft is superb, the modes of investigation by turns lyrical, surreal, meditative, allegorical, direct-speaking, and allusive.” —Jane Hirshfield

 

NER congratulates contributor Quan Barry on the release of her fiction debut, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born (Pantheon, 2015), a novel of modern Vietnam as experienced through the eyes of a young girl born just years before the country’s unification. Barry is the author of four poetry books, including the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry winner Water Puppets, and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry, and her work has appeared in such publications as Ms. and the New Yorker. Barry’s poem, “Lion,” appeared in NER 27.2.

“. . . lyrical, luminous, and suspenseful all at once. Rabbit’s experience of wartime and reconciliation in Vietnam is one that I haven’t yet encountered in fiction, and it is rendered with shocking clarity and pathos on the page.” —Jesmyn Ward, National Book Award-winning author of Salvage the Bones

 

there's something

It is our pleasure to announce the release of contributor Charles Baxter‘s collection of ten stories, There’s Something I Want to Tell You (Pantheon, 2015). Including five stories named for virtue and five for vice, one of the selections from the compilation, “Sloth,” appeared in NER 34.3-4, and his work has also appeared in NER 27.4 and 15.1. Baxter’s third novel, The Feast of Love, was a finalist for the 2000 National Book Award. Baxter’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic, New York Review of Books, and Harper’s, among other journals and magazines. His fiction has been anthologized in Best American Short Stories seven times, eleven times in The Pushcart Prize Anthology, and translated into many languages.

An audio excerpt of Baxter reading from There’s Something I Want to Tell You at the 2014 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference is available here.

“Bare storylines can’t convey the quickly captivating simple narratives . . . or the revealing moments to which Baxter brings the reader. . . Similarly, Baxter, a published poet, at times pushes his fluid, controlled prose to headier altitudes. Nearly as organic as a novel, this is more intriguing, more fun in disclosing its connective tissues through tales that stand well on their own.” —Kirkus Reviews, *starred review*

 

New Books for the New Year from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community, News & Notes

coffey“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —Jay Parini, Middlebury College D. E. Axinn Professor of English & Creative Writing and author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station

NER congratulates contributor Michael Coffey on his first collection of short stories, The Business of Naming Things (Bellevue Literary Press, 2015), which includes his story “Sons,” originally published in NER 34.1. Coffey’s essay “Waiting for Nauman” has appeared in our online NER Digital series, as well.

Publisher’s Weekly: There is no conventional narrative here… This collection which features first-, second-, and third-person narration, is vibrant and unsparing.

Edmund White, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own Story: “Michael Coffey brings us so close to his subjects it is almost embarassing. Whether he’s writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?

Michael Coffey has published three books of poems, a book about baseball’s perfect games, and co-edited a book about Irish immigration to America. He is a former co-editorial director of Publishers Weekly.

 

watch me go“Mark Wisniewski has constructed a fabulous noir that touches on the third-rail of American life and the inside rail at the track. His voice is down-to-earth and sharp, delivering swift, salty pages concerning murder and jails, justice and damaged souls.”—Daniel Woodrell, PEN Award winner and Edgar-nominated author of Winter’s Bone

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Mark Wisniewski‘s newest novel, Watch Me Go (Penguin Putnam). His story “Karmic Vapor” appeared in NER 25.1.

Mark Wisniewski has published two novels, Show Up, Look Good and Confessions of a Polish Used Car Salesman. His stories have appeared in a number of publications including Southern Review and Antioch Review.

“The pure, muscular story-telling of Mark Wisniewski’s Watch Me Go made it irresistible.”New York Times bestselling author Salman Rushdie

 

muldoonCongratulations to NER contributor Paul Muldoon on the publication of his newest book of poetry, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). Muldoon, originally from Ireland, is Howard G. B. Clark ’21 Professor at Princeton University and poetry editor of the New Yorker. His most recent collections are Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Horse Latitudes (2006), and Maggot (2010). His essays on Fernando Pessoa, Emily Dickinson and Seamus Heaney have appeared in NER 23.4, 24.2, and 34.2, respectively.

“. . . another wild, expansive collection from the eternally surprising Paul Muldoon, 2003 winner and poetry editor at the New Yorker. ‘Watchfulness’ is the buzzword surrounding this one, and it seems as great a place as any to start the 2015 reading year.” —Publisher’s Weekly

 

sandoperaIt is with pleasure that we announce the release of NER contributor Philip Metres‘s newest poetry collection, Sand Opera (Alice James, 2015), an exploration of war in the modern age through examinations of the Abu Ghraib prison, childhood perspectives, and the role of the US government. Metres is the author of A Concordance of Leaves, abu ghraib arias, To See the Earth, Behind the Lines: War Resistance Poetry on the American Homefront Since 1941, and other books. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry and has garnered numerous awards, including two NEA fellowships, four Ohio Arts Council Grants, the Arab American Book Award, and a 2014 Creative Workforce Fellowship. He teaches literature and creative writing at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Metres’s translations from Russian were published in NER 34.3-4, and his poetry has appeared in 22.3, 23.4, and 25.4.

“Phil Metres transforms our prostrate sorrow and gracious rage against the banal evil of the administered world into aria and opera.” —Fady Joudah, author of Alight and The Earth in the Attic

 

New Books for November from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, News & Notes


brocke-clarke
Clarke dazzles with a dizzying study in extremes, cruising at warp speed between bleak and optimistic, laugh-out-loud funny and unbearable sadness. His comedy of errors is impossible to put downPublishers Weekly

Brock Clarke has published his new book, The Happiest People in the World. Clarke’s work has appeared in several issues of NER, most recently in the current issue and 33.1.

Clarke is the author of five works of fiction, including the novels Exley and An Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England. His fiction and non-fiction have been included in a number of magazines, journals, newspapers, and anthologies, and have earned him an NEA Literature Fellowship, the Mary McCarthy Prize, and the Prairie Schooner Book Series Prize, among other awards.

 

lewisFor Lewis, roller derby represents some of her favorite things: women’s empowerment, Midwestern populism, spectacle and ambiguous sexuality.—Vox Talk

Congratulations to NER contributor Trudy Lewis on her new novel The Empire Rolls. Lewis’s work has appeared in Volumes 20.1, 21.3, and 25.1-2 of NER.

 

 

our-secret-life-in-movies-21We are particularly excited to announced that NER Associate Editor J. M. Tyree has published Our Secret Life in the Movies, a collection of stories in collaboration with Michael McGriff. Film scholars Tyree and McGriff present paired short stories inspired by selected works of film. Tyree’s previous book is BFI Film Classics: Salesman (British Film Institute, 2012). His work has appeared numerous times in NER, most recently in 30.4.

“Wildly intelligent and deeply felt, Our Secret Life in the Movies gives us a fascinating look at American life, shot through an insightful and compassionate lens. After reading it, the world seems bigger. A tremendous book.” —Molly Antopol, author of The UnAmericans

“Reading Our Secret Life in the Movies is like finding a lost frequency on the AM dial. The voices you hear in this book are strange, hypnotic, and intensely American.” —Jim Gavin, author of Middle Men

“A book of poignant and affecting beauty. Readers are presented with characters who are losing their innocence in lockstep with the changing nation they inhabit, and the end result is a book that provides great insight into both who we are and how we got this way. A remarkable achievement.” —Skip Horack, author of The Eden Hunter

Sheenan writes demigodshumorous and poetic prose-tales of everyday valor and agony set in the vast apartment complexes, spas, and car washes of 21st-century America. Library Journal

We are pleased to announce the release of NER author Aurelie Sheehan’s new book, a collection of short stories entitled Demigods on Speedway. Sheehan has published two collections of short stories, Jewelery Box: A Collection of Histories, and Jack Kerouac is Pregnant, as well as two novels, History Lessons for Girls, and The Anxiety of Everyday Objects. Her story Horse, Girl, Landscape, appeared in NER 26.3.

New Books for October from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

gallaher. . . as he struggles to understand the meaning of family, love, and death, Gallaher addresses life questions in a way that few poets of his generation have been willing to risk.—BOA Editions

We are pleased to announce the publication of In a Landscape (BOA Editions), a book-length poem by NER contributor John Gallaher. His poem “Your Lover, Later” was featured in 30.1 and “In a Landscape: VI” first appeared in 33.2.

“Reading these poems is like listening in on the thoughts of a brilliant mind at work on unsolvable, often existential, problems, the poet always peering outward, toward a landscape of autobiography and memory that ‘goes on all night, dotted with little fires.'” —Kevin Prufer, author of National Anthem

John Gallaher is the author of The Little Book of Guesses (Four Way, 2007), Map of the Folded World (University of Akron Press, 2009), and Your Father on the Train of Ghosts (BOA Editions Ltd., 2011), co-written with G. C. Waldrep. He currently teaches at Northwest Missouri State University and co-edits the Laurel Review.

 

a selected history of her heart.pdf. . . a collision of bodies, cultures, opportunity and motive, innocence and experience that layers a coming-of-age story into a multi-cultural background.Martha Collins, author of White Papers

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Carole Simmons Oles’s most recent collection of poetry, A Selected History of Her Heart (University of New Mexico Press, 2014). Her poem “Travel With the Missing” was featured in 20.3.

“These powerhouse poems reach out generation to generation with generosity and compassion. These poems invite us in, offer food and drink and shelter.”—Peggy Shumaker, author of Gnawed Bones.

Carole Simmons Oles has authored eight other collections of poetry, including The Deed: Poems (Louisiana State University Press, 1991) and Waking Stone: Inventions on the Life of Harriet Hosmer (University of Arkansas Press, 2006).

 

howard-progressive-education-coverPropelled by layers of allusion and irony, Howard’s account of the children is a comedy with a plot. Howard gained fame for verse in the voices of literary and historical characters, often very sophisticated ones: the sixth-graders here are as much fun as any characters in any poetry this year, even as their improbably long senteces ask, seriously, “how the system we’re trying / to live by operates.”—Publishers Weekly

MacArthur Grant recipient, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner, and NER author Richard Howard has published his most recent book of poetry, A Progressive Education (Turtle Point). Garnering from his own school days, Howard uses the voices of children at a Cleveland private school to probe serious questions with irony and wit. Howard’s poem “Eidyia: An Interview” was featured in NER 27.1.

“It seems to me that, in the voices of L. Frank Baum, Wallace Stevens, and a whole cast of others, Richard has been working toward these fifth graders all along, minds bent on creative engagement with knowledge but able to stave off, for the span of their youth, for the span of a poem, an excess of hopelessness, which damns all art and life. Richard’s work in and on behalf of poetry is, precisely, an antidote to hopelessness.”—Craig Morgan Teicher for the Los Angeles Review of Books

New Books from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

PlacetoRead” . . . a collection of personal retrospectives that deserve a place in the finest tradition of the American essay.”

We are pleased to announce the publication of NER contributor Michael Cohen‘s essay collection, A Place to Read: Life and Books (Interactive Press). The book includes an investigative essay published in NER 31.4 as well as The King in Winter, which appeared as an NER digital.

From Christina Thompson, Editor, Harvard Review: “Michael Cohen’s essays on the reading life are a treat to read. Relaxed, personal, wide-ranging, they contain fascinating nuggets of information and lively assessments of hundreds of books, as well as a whole life’s worth of thoughtful rumination on time, love, travel, and family, as well as what it means to be, almost existentially, a reader.”

“Each [piece] is in its own way a comment on the human situation, filtered through a personal optic that is both refined and erudite. Amusing, highly personal, insightful, they’ll make you smile, smirk, frown, and gasp . . .” —E. A. Allen, author of the Montclaire Mysteries

Since retiring from university teaching, Michael Cohen’s essays have appeared in Harvard Review, Birding, the Humanist, Missouri Review, and the Kenyon Review in addition to NER. He is also the author of five books, including a poetry text, The Poem in Question (Harcourt Brace, 1983) and an award winning book on Shakespeare’s Hamlet (Georgia, 1989).

 

“The poetic sensibility itself is characterized by restlessness–a ‘daring’ aspiration toward fuller meaning, feeling, and vision.”

9781555976811Congratulations to NER contributor Carl Phillips on the publication of his collection of essays, The Art of Daring: Risk, Restlessness, Imagination (Graywolf). An excerpt of this book appears in NER 35.2. His reflection, “On Restlessness,” can be read in full online.

From Publishers Weekly: “Abundant autobiographical glimpses lend substance and specificity to Phillips’s tenet that ‘art and life are forever part of the same thing.’ Phillips analyzes individual poems by Shakespeare, Herbert, Shelley, Frost, Gunn, and others, along with his own work. The result is a slim volume memorable for delicate
insights . . . and for its grounding of theory in the life and personality of the poet.”

Carl Phillips is the author of twelve books of poetry, including Silverchest (2013), Double Shadow (2011), and Rest of Love (2004). He is the recipient of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, an award in literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Library of Congress, and the Academy of American Poets. He teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

” . . . his poems, more than anyone else’s, take the shape of fire, all its ambiguity and wind-shreddedness, all its likeness to poppies in the wheat.” —H. K. Hix

Gpankey100Eric Pankey has published his tenth poetry collection, Dismantling the Angel (Parlor Press, 2014). Pankey has been appeared in several issues of NER, most recently in 34.1.

“In these precise, dream-like poems, Eric Pankey peers through the clarifying lens of metaphor and parable to meditate on mystery, human sympathy and the divine. Here, the shifting image of fire both articulates and consumes our sense of the vastness of history and the ineffable nature of divinity.”—Kevin Prufer

Pankey’s other publications include The Pear as One Example: New and Selected Poems 1984-2008 and Trace. He is Professor of English and the Heritage Chair in Writing at George Mason University.

 

9781556594663_p0_v1_s600“Kasischke astonishes with her lyricism and metaphorical power as she considers illness and mortality through exacting, imaginative poems.”

Laura Kasischke’s newest collection of poetry, The Infinitesimals (Copper Canyon, 2014) is now out with strong reviews. Her work appears most recently in NER 34.2.

From Publisher’s Weekly: The brevity of Kasischke’s lines movingly captures the absence of death and the limitations on memory, and her mastery of meticulous, though seemingly effortless, description shines throughout, as when she dubs a cake once baked for her father as “Soggy church bell on a plate,” or describes a tumor as a “terrible frog/ Of moonlight and dampness on a log.”

Laura Kasischke has published nine novels and eight previous collections of poetry. For her collection, Space, in Chains, she received the National Book Critics Circle Award. She teaches at the University of Michigan.

 

9780822963127_p0_v2_s260x420“It’s the music, the beauty, after all, that’s balm to all this sorrow. The American reminds me of this.” —Ross Gay

Longtime NER contributor David Roderick has published his poetry collection, The Americans with the University of Pittsburgh Press. His work has previously appeared in NER issues 24.2 and 32.1.

The Americans is a compelling meditation on the ways we go about our lives at this cultural moment, often unmoored from the facts of history though we drift along its shores. Part complicated love letter to suburbia, these poems demand that we consider not only what we are drawn to but also what we fail to see, how the apocryphal feeds our cultural amnesia. The poet asks: ‘Must nostalgia / walk like a prince through all our rooms?’ This lovely collection shows us a way to confront that question within ourselves.” —Natasha Tretheway, U.S. Poet Laureate

David Roderick’s first book, Blue Colonial, won the APR/Honickman Prize. He is a recipient of the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship, and he currently teaches in the MFA Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

 

Lisettes-List-A-NovelNew York Times bestselling novelist Susan Vreeland is back with the publication of Lisette’s List. Her short story, “Love Burning,” was featured in NER 20.2.

Susan Vreeland is the author of four New York Times bestselling novels—The Passion of Artemisia, Luncheon of the Boating Party, Clara and Mr. Tiffany, and Girl in Hyacinth Blue, which was adapted into a Hallmark Hall of Fame television drama. Her books have been translated into 26 languages.

“Vreeland’s ability to make this complex historical novel as luminous as a Tiffany lamp is nothing less than remarkable.”The Washington Post

“Vreeland’s writing is so graceful, her research so exhaustive, that a reader is enfolded in the world of Tiffany and Driscoll.”Los Angeles Times

New Books for July from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books

The Great Glass Sea“A genuinely fascinating novel—for its inventiveness, its passionate breadth and vision.”

We are pleased to announce Grove Atlantic’s publication of The Great Glass Sea, the debut novel from NER contributor Josh Weil. His piece “Liberation Square” appears in NER 27.2

Anthony Doerr of The New York Times Book Review describes Weil’s writing as “Full of tenderness and looming menace . . . Gripping . . . Weil meticulously imagines people and their histories, and presents them as a product of their places.”

Josh Weil is a National Book Award “Five Under Thirty-Five” author, and recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, Columbia University, the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and Sewanee. His celebrated collection of novellas, The New Valley, was awarded the Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His fiction has appeared in Esquire, Granta, and other publications.

 

“A lively and clever story starring an estate with an intricate history…”Makkai

Congratulations to NER contributor Rebecca Makkai on the release of her second novel, The Hundred-Year House (Viking). Rebecca Makkai’s story “The Briefcase” appears in 29.2.

From Publisher’s Weekly: “The book is exceptionally well constructed, with engaging characters busy reinventing themselves throughout, and delightful twists that surprise and satisfy.”

Rebecca Makkai’s work was chosen by Salman Rushdie for inclusion in Best American Short Stories 2008. Her work has also appeared in Threepenny Review, Iowa Review, Shenandoah, and Sewanee Review. She is a 2004 graduate of Bread Loaf and in January 2014, she was awarded a Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, receiving an award of $25,000.

 

“Thoughtful American readers who have grown tired of hothouse surrealism should embrace Sosnicki’s humor, understated intelligence, and dry ironies . . .”

theworldshared_bookstoresmallerNER congratulates Boris Dralyuk on his translation of Polish poet Darius Sosnicki’s first collection, The World Shared (BOA). Boris Dralyuk’s translation of “The Jolt” appears in issue 34.3-4.

From Publisher’s Weekly: “The first American book from the prolific and celebrated Polish poet and critic not only survives translation; its urbane, articulate, unpredictable freeverse positively flourishes in the American English that the facing-page edition provides.”

Boris Dralyuk has translated several collections of poetry and prose from Russian and Polish. He is the recipient of the 2011 Compass Translation Award and received joint first prize in the 2012 Joseph Brodsky/Stephen Spender Translation Prize with Irina Mashinski. He is a co-editor of the forthcoming Anthology of Russian Literature from Pushkin to Brodsky (Penguin Classics, 2014).

These books can be purchased from Powell’s Books and other independent booksellers. 

New Books for June from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

guterson

“… the boundless potential of everyday encounters.”

We congratulate NER contributor David Guterson on the publication of his newest collection of stories, Problems with People (Knopf). We are proud to have recently published his stories “Tenant” (NER 33.3) and “Feedback” (NER 35.1).

From Publisher’s Weekly: “People struggle to connect with each other in this succinct but ambitious collection of 10 stories from the author of Snow Falling on Cedars.”

David Guterson is the author of five novels: Snow Falling on Cedars (winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award), East of the MountainsThe OtherOur Lady of the ForestSeattle Post-Intelliger, and Ed King; and a story collection, The Country Ahead of Us, the Country Behind. He is also a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship.

 

978-0-8101-5244-1-frontcover“…stories so alight with lust and danger and longing and loss…”

We are pleased to announce Triquarterly Books’ publication of Let Me See It, the newest collection of short stories from NER contributor James Magruder. His short story “Matthew Aiken’s Vie Bohème” appears in NER 32.3.

Author of The Wonder Bread Summer, Jessica Anya Blau: “Let Me See It overflows with honesty, hilarity, and heart. It’s impossible not to love this book, impossible to turn away from its brilliant prose, wicked humor, and utterly engaging characters.”

James Magruder, author of the novel Sugarless, is also a playwright and award-winning translator. He teaches dramaturgy at Swarthmore College and fiction at the University of Baltimore.

 

9780812993967_custom-d846708e56eebe6d09a303e84047536cbd3f9b93-s2-c85…a vivid and often amusing portrait of the New York’s Upper East Side literary scene…

Congratulations to David Gilbert on the paperback publication of his novel, & Sons (Random). Gilbert is a 1990 graduate of Middlebury College, and read his work at a tribute event for NER hosted by Middlebury’s Potomac Theatre Project in 2012.

From The New York Times literary critic Michiko Kakutani: “A contemporary New York variation on The Brothers Karamazov, featuring a J. D. Salinger–like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford’s classic The Good Soldier . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy, and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters’ memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail.”

David Gilbert is the author of the story collection Remote Feed and the novel The Normals. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, GQ, and Bomb.

These books can be purchased from Powell’s Books and independent booksellers. 

New Books for May from NER Authors

Categories: NER Authors' Books, NER Community

413IG2ug3HL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Hypnotic as it is profound

We are pleased to announce that NER contributor Norman Lock‘s new novel, The Boy in His Winter, is out from Bellevue Literary Press. His most recent story for NER, “A Theory of the Self,” appears in 34.2.

Pulitzer-Prize winning author, Gilbert King: In this surreal and otherworldly river journey through time, Norman Lock transports Huck Finn down the Mississippi and deep into America’s history—and future. Elegant and imaginative, The Boy in His Winter is a tale that’s as hypnotic as it is profound.”

Norman Lock is a recipient of a fellowship from the New Jersey Council on the Arts, saw his play The House of Correction revived in Istanbul, and published a new collection of stories, Love Among the Particles, featuring three pieces of fiction originally published in New England Review.

 

9781556594663_p0_v1_s260x420Mythical sea beasts, loads of laundry, and high school athletics 

Congratulations to NER contributor Laura Kasischke on the publication of her newest collection of poems, The Infinitesimals (Copper Canyon Press). Laura Kasischke’s poetry first appeared in NER 16.1 in 1994, and most recently in NER 32.4.

Publisher’s Weekly describes Kasischke’s latest work: “Mythical sea beasts, loads of laundry, and high school athletics all populate Kasischke’s rich imagination.”

Laura Kasischke is currently the Allan Seager Collegiate Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. She is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for her book Space, in Chains (Copper Canyon) and has recently been honored by the Michigan Library Association with the 2013 Michigan Author Award.

 

9780544074811_p0_v2_s260x420A story of second chances

We are pleased to announce Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s publication of Wonderland, the newest novel from NER contributor Stacey D’Erasmo. Her essay “Influence: A Practice in Three Wanders” appears in issue 31.4.

Publisher’s Weekly calls this “A story of second chances . . . meticulously crafted. . . .”

Stacey D’Erasmo is the recipient of a 2009 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in Fiction. Her essays, features, and reviews have appeared in the New York Times Magazine,  New York Times Book ReviewBoston ReviewBookforum, and Ploughshares, among other publications.

 

As much prayer as it is poetrySamaras

NER is pleased to congratulate Nicholas Samaras on the recent publication of his newest collection of poetry American Psalm, World Psalm (Ashland Poetry Press). His poetry has been published in NER several times since 1994, and his most recent contributions (“Approach” / “At Night”) appear in 28.3.

From The Daily Beat News Blog: “Samaras … has reinvented modern poetry with this groundbreaking book … The poet combines a sense of morality that is virtually unmatched with a concrete abstraction reminiscent of the likes of a Pablo Neruda.”

Nicholas Samaras’s first book, Hands of the Saddlemaker, was selected for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1992. His poems have appeared in the New Yorker, Poetry, New Republic, Kenyon Review, and elsewhere. In 1997, he was a recipient of the National Endowment of the Arts Poetry Fellowship.