New England Review Award for Emerging Writers

Finalists announced for 2016

New England Review announces, with enormous pleasure, the finalists for the second annual New England Review Award for Emerging Writers.

DSC_3006Please join us in congratulating our six finalists for 2016:

Kelly Grey Carlisle  (35.4)
Francine Conley  (36.3)
Rav Grewal-Kök  (36.4)
Hai-Dang Phan  (36.4)
Vincent Poturica  (36.4)
Lisa Taddeo  (36.1)

The winner, to be announced later this month, will receive a scholarship to the 2016 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Congratulations to them all—we are proud to have published such strong work from emerging writers in all three genres.

NER Receives NEA Support for 2016

PrintNew England Review is delighted to announce the support of the National Endowment for the Arts through 2016, with our third annual Art Works grant.

Beginning in 2014, New England Review was able to double its payment to writers appearing in the print journal—the first increase in 20 years. Thanks to this $10,000 grant, we will continue paying this higher rate through our next volume, in 2016, as well as continuing to pay contributors to NER Digital, our original writing feature for the web.

The only arts funder in the nation to award grants to recipients in every state, the NEA awards total more than $27.6 million. We are grateful to the NEA for their help in supporting writers at every level.

For more information on projects included in the NEA grant announcement, go to arts.gov. Congratulations to all the award recipients.

"Best American" News

Congratulations to all from NER

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Congratulations to all who have been recognized in
Best American Essays 2015, including
Kate Lebo for her essay “The Loudproof Room” (NER 35.2)

Notable selections in this year’s list include:
“Village Bakery” by Ben Miller (NER 35.2)
“The Haircut” by Larry I. Palmer (NER 35.1)
“Kindle 451” by Jeff Staiger (NER 34.3-4)

AND
to all those recognized in
Best American Short Stories 2015,
including Laura Lee Smith for her story “Unsafe at Any Speed” (NER 35.1)

Other Distinguished Stories selections include:
“Sloth” by Charles Baxter (NER 34.3-4)
“Studies in Composition” by Leslie Bazzett (NER 34.3-4)
“At the Bedside” by Ricardo Nuila (NER 35.1)
“Clear Conscience” by Christine Sneed (NER 35.3)

AND
Congratulations to all featured in
Best American Mystery Stories 2015, including
Steven Heighton for his story “Shared Room on Union” (NER 35.1)

New Books from NER Authors

31x688yc99L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Mesmerizing and beautiful in the language and rhythms of his pen. ―Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University

We congratulate NER contributor Reginald Dwayne Betts on the recent release of his poetic collection Bastards of the Reagan Era (Stahlecker Selections)His work appeared in NER 35.5.

Regniald Dwayne Bett’s Shahid Reads His Own Palm won the Beatrice Hawley Award. His memoir, A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison, received the 2010 NAACP Image Award for nonfiction. He is a Yale Law student.

Bastards of the Reagan Era is available from independent booksellers.

41Nam6YLaYL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Yusef Komunyakaa is one of our period’s most significant and individual voices . . . He has a near-revelatory capacity to give himself over to his subject matter . . . Dazzling. —David Wojahn, Poetry on Yusef Komunyakaa

We are also pleased to announce Komunyakaa‘s collection, The Emperor of Water Clocks (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux).

Komunyakaa’s books of poetry include the Pulitzer Prize-winning Neon VernacularTalking Dirty to the GodsTabooWarhorsesThe Chameleon Couch, and Testimony: A Tribute to Charlie Parker. His plays, performance art, and libretti have been performed internationally. He teaches at New York University.

The Emperor of Water Clocks is available from independent booksellers.

51cX2y5gkLL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_A truly interdisciplinary thinker, Gregerson reaches through literature, art, and the everyday to find territory in which the confounding conditions of our age still give rise to understanding and empathy.Publishers Weekly

NER is pleased to announce the publication of Linda Gregerson‘s first book of collected work, Prodigal: New and Selected Poems, 1976-2014 (Mariner Books). Gregerson’s work has appeared in multiple issues of NER, most recently NER 31.4.

Gregerson is the author of Waterborne, The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep, and Fire in the Conservatory. She teaches Renaissance literature and creative writing at the University of Michigan. Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry as well as in the Atlantic, Poetry, Ploughshares, the Yale Review, TriQuarterly, and other publications. Among her many awards and honors are a Guggenheim Fellowship, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, four Pushcart Prizes, and a Kingsley Tufts Award.

Prodigal is available from independent booksellers.

513YIrt8CZL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_Shards of elegy, lament, intermittent flashes of wit, a philosophical sensuality throughout: this is subtle, sophisticated, gorgeous, and unsettling work by a poet open to being ‘torn by the lyric’ as well as history. Sze-Lorrain aims ‘to honor / the invisible,’ ‘to get silence right’: she does. —Maureen N. McLane, author of My Poets

Fiona Sze-Lorrain‘s The Ruined Elegance: Poems has been published by Princeton University Press. Her work appears in NER 35.2.

Eleanor Wilner, author of Tourist in Hell, writes of Ruined Elegance: “The luminous art of Sze-Lorrain reveals how imaginative vision requires the veil. Hers is a contemporary, polycultural poetry, a language of distance and silence, rich with suggestion. The disparate, brilliant images of her Ruined Elegance fend off narrative, ‘torn by the lyric,’ whose instrument is more enduring than its players: its ‘strings stayed taut. None / broke. Her fingernails did.'”

Fiona Sze-Lorrain is a poet, literary translator, editor, and zheng harpist. The author of two previous books of poetry in English, My Funeral Gondola and Water the Moon, she also writes and translates in French and Chinese. She lives in Paris.

The Ruined Elegance: Poems is available from Princeton University Press and independent booksellers.

5159SYcAF2L._SX373_BO1,204,203,200_Whether in praise songs, appraisals, or meditations, the poems of Boy with Thorn embody an ardent grace . . . The result is an extraordinary and ultimately irreducible debut. —Terrance Hayes, judge

Rickey Laurentiis has released his latest collection, Boy with Thorn, winner of the 2014 Cave Canem Poetry Prize (University of Pittsburgh Press). Laurentiis’s work appeared in NER‘S Volume 36.2.

Laurentiis, a Cave Canem Graduate Fellow, is the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, as well as fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Italy, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Washington University in St. Louis. His poems appear or are forthcoming in Boston Review, Fence, Kenyon Review, New Republic, Poetry, and elsewhere. Born in New Orleans, he currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Boy with Thorn is available from the University of Pittsburgh Press and independent booksellers.

A superbly personal biography that pulsates with intelligence, scholarship, and heart. —Kirkus Review

NER is pleased to announce that founding editor Jay Parini’s Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 3.44.34 PMEmpire of Self: A Life of Gore Vidal was recently published with Doubleday Books. Parini’s work, including “An Interview with Gore Vidal” (NER 14.1), has appeared in multiple NER issues.

Parini has published over two dozen books, including Benjamin’s CrossingThe Last Station, Robert Frost: A Life, and The Apprentice Lover. He is a winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1993 and the John Ciardi Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002. He has received honorary degrees from Lafayette College and the University of Scranton. Currently, Parini is the D. E. Axinn Professor of English and Creative Writing at Middlebury College.

Parini’s access to Vidal and his thoughtful reflections on him establish this as the definitive biography of a major writer. — Publisher’s Weekly. 

Empire of Self: A Life of Gore Vidal is available from Doubleday Books and independent booksellers.

 

Announcing NER 36.3

New Issue New AuthorsNew Website

 

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Order Now!

 Three first-time-ever publications from new names in fiction.
Six new-to-NER authors in nonfiction.
Four new-to-NER poets.
And a brand new NER website 


 

New England Review 36.3

FICTION

MICHAEL DEAGLER • STEPHEN DIXON • CAITLIN HAYES • CHRISTOPHER KNAPP • GENEVIEVE PLUNKETT •
MARY RECHNER • WAYNE MICHAEL WINFIELD

 

POETRY

KIM ADDONIZIO • GABRIELLE CALVOCORESSI • FRANCINE CONLEY • ALEX DIMITROV • W. S. DI PIERO • JOHN GALLAHER • TIMOTHY LIU • LESLIE ADRIENNE MILLER • TYLER MILLS • LUCIA PERILLO • SAM SAX • C. DALE YOUNG

 

NONFICTION
MUKUND BELLIAPPA 
explores how the tiger hunt inspired an empire and decimated a species

URSUAL HEGI borrows from the present to imagine her way into the past

ROBERT HAHN hears the voice of Nick Carraway in the novels of our time

PAULA SCHWARTZ considers the strength and resilience of Fanny Dutet, Resistance fighter, Holocaust survivor, and friend

MAXIMILIAN VOLOSHIN‘s literary hijinks end in a duel
 (translated by Alex Cigale)

JOHN MILTON EDWARDS remembers the “fiction factory” in the days before the MFA