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NER presents a reading from “Please Do Not Remove”

Categories: Readings

Please-Do-Not-Remove_cover-front-finalIn partnership with Middlebury’s Special Collections and Archives, NER is pleased to present a reading from Please Do Not Remove: A Collection Celebrating Vermont Literature and Libraries, in the Davis Family Library Special Collections and Archives Room 101, at 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 10.

The book’s editor, Angela Palm, and a lineup of three stellar Vermont poets—David Dillon, Karin Gottshall, and Gary Margolis—will read from and discuss selections from the anthology. Refreshments and door prizes too! Free and open to the public.

“NER Out Loud” Brings the Page to the Stage

Categories: News & Notes, Readings

ner_35-2_front_cover-sqIn the tradition of Public Radio International’s “Selected Shorts,” Middlebury College students will read selections from the New England Review in a live performance entitled “NER Out Loud” at the Mahaney Center for the Arts Concert Hall on February 24, 7:30 p.m. The event will be followed by a “S’more Readings” reception with the readers and NER staff, along with representatives of several student literary magazines. Both events are free and open to the public. ASL interpreting provided.

Readers will include Kevin Benscheidt ’17, Brenna Christensen ’17, Caitlyn Duffy ’15.5, Cole Ellison ’17, Jabari Matthew ’17, Melissa MacDonald ’15, and Sally Seitz ’17, with Debanjan Roychoudhury ’16 as MC. Editors and contributors to the student literary magazines Sweatervest, Blackbird, and Room 404 will also be on hand at the post-show reception to discuss their publications and give sample readings from their pages. Attendees will be invited to enjoy s’mores while listening to the readings in the lobby.

NER Out Loud is the result of a new partnership between the Mahaney Center for the Arts, the Oratory Society, and the New England Review. NER Out Loud will take place on Tuesday, February 24, 2015, at 7:30 P.M. in the Concert Hall of the Kevin P. Mahaney ’84 Center for the Arts. The reception will take place in the downstairs lobby immediately following the performance. Admission is free and the public is welcome. The Mahaney Center is located at 72 Porter Field Road in Middlebury, just off Route 30 south, on the campus of Middlebury College. Free parking is available. For more information, call (802) 443-MIDD (6433) or go to http://go.middlebury.edu/arts.

NER + NEA = More Support for Writers

Categories: News & Notes

NEA-logo-color-e1320093807889New England Review is delighted to announce that we’ve won the support of the National Endowment for the Arts for 2015 through an Art Works grant. In 2014 we were able to double our payment to writers for the print journal—the first increase in 20 years—and because of this grant we’ll be able to continue paying this higher rate through the next volume. But this year we’re going to do even better: beginning in 2015 we will pay contributors to NER Digital, our feature of original writing for the web. Up until now writers have been gracious enough to allow their work to be published there for the gift of a subscription to NER, but now we’ll be able to pay them an honorarium in cold hard cash as well. We’d like to thank associate editor J. M. Tyree for his dedication to the NER Digital project—for masterminding the idea and building it through its first years.

The NEA’s fellowships for writers, which in 2015 will be awarded to 36 poets, will honor a number of NER contributors. Congratulations to all who earned a place on the list this year, including Sean Hill (NER Digital), Eliot Khalil Wilson (29.4), Kerry James Evans (30.2), Anders Carlson-Wee (forthcoming, 36.1), Sara Eliza Johnson (29.4), Shara Lessley (33.1), and Melissa Range (34.1).

Poetry from Debora Greger in NER 35.3

Categories: Poetry

 

Head, Perhaps of an Angel | Debora Greger

limestone, with traces of polychromy, c. 1200

[view as PDF]  

Point Dume was the point,
he said, but we never came close,
no matter how far we walked the shale
broken from California.
Someone’s garden
had slipped, hanging itself by a vine
from the cliffs of some new Babylon
past Malibu.

[Read more 

New Fiction From Lenore Myka in NER 35.3

Categories: Fiction

Mascots | Lenore Myka

[Read the complete story here]

. . . Once, a Swede—a baby—declared that he loved Papua New Guinea.

We sniggered. It had been his first post after graduate school; he’d only ever been there and here; it was too soon in his short career for him to realize that he was lying, most especially to himself. The rest of us understood that saying you loved Papua New Guinea was like saying you loved it here, in this country with its clay roads naked children ran about and shat in, its miles of tin shanties you averted your eyes from whenever you took an air-conditioned car to or from the airport. Saying you loved Papua New Guinea was like saying you loved this place where you couldn’t buy a decent loaf of bread much less a bottle of Bordeaux; where you lived and worked behind high walls and locked yourself behind bars, fastening them over the windows and doors of your home at night, and found yourself eyeing the guard at the gate, the gardener and housekeeper and cook, wondering if one of them hadn’t been responsible for the disappearance of the opal pendant you’d inherited from your grandmother or the fifty euros you’d sworn you left in your trousers last Saturday night when you’d come home from the disco drunk and reeking of other expatriates’ sweat.

[Read the complete story here]

Lenore Myka‘s short story collection, King of the Gypsies, was the winner of the 2014 G.S. Sharat Chandra Prize for Short Fiction (BkMk Press, 2015). Her fiction has been selected as a notable short story by Best American Short Stories and Best American Non-Required Reading. Her stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Iowa Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, West Branch, and Massachusetts Review, among others.

NER Vermont Reading Series | October 23, 2014

Categories: NER VT Reading Series, Readings


Please join us in Middlebury on October 23rd, 7 p.m. at Carol’s Hungry Mind Cafe for the next reading in our series, featuring Emily Arnason Casey, Kathryn Davis, and
Diana Whitney.

 

CaseyEmily Arnason Casey‘s writing has appeared in Mid-American Review, Sonora Review, the anthology Please Do Not Remove, and elsewhere. She was a finalist for the 2014 Ruth Stone Poetry Prize. She earned an MFA from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and teaches writing at the Community College of Vermont. An editor at the online journal Atlas & Alice, Emily lives in Burlington with her husband and two sons, and is working on a collection of essays about loss and longing.

Kathryn Davis (c) Anne Davis-resize

Kathryn Davis is the author of seven novels: Labrador, The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, Hell, The Walking Tour, Versailles, The Thin Place, and Duplex (Graywolf, 2013). She has been the recipient of the Kafka Prize, the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the 2006 Lannan Award for Fiction. She lives in Montpelier and is Hurst Senior Writer-in-Residence in the MFA program at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

DianaWhitneyheadshot-cropDiana Whitney‘s first book of poetry, Wanting It, was released in August 2014 by Harbor Mountain Press. Her essays and poems have appeared in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, Crab Orchard Review, Puerto del Sol, Numéro Cinq, Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, and elsewhere. She graduated from Dartmouth College and Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and attended the Warren Wilson College MFA Program. A yoga instructor and lifelong athlete, Diana lives in Brattleboro with her family.

NER Reading at Stories Cafe, Los Angeles | Fri., Sept. 26

Categories: Readings

StoriesLAStories Books in Echo Park 1716 West Sunset Boulevard will host the first New England Review reading in California on Friday, September 26, 7:30 p.m.

Fiction writers Steve De Jarnatt, Sands Hall, and Lou Mathews, and poet, essayist Charles Hood will read from their work published in the current and past issues of the magazine.

Steve De Jarnatt (NER 34.1) grew up in the small logging town of Longview, Washington across the Columbia River from where Raymond Carver was born. He recently “broke out” of show biz after a long career writing and directing film and television, (the cult feature Miracle Mile is among his many credits), and he received his MFA from Antioch Los Angeles and is now pursuing the lucrative world of short fiction. Steve’s work has appeared in many journals, and one of his stories was among the 100 Distinguished Stories for Best American Short Stories 2013.

Sands Hall, whose story appears in the current issue, is the author of the novel, Catching Heaven (Ballantine) a Willa Award Finalist for Best Contemporary Fiction and a Random House Reader’s Circle selection; and of a book of writing essays and exercises, Tools of the Writers Craft.  She holds an MFA in Fiction from the Iowa Writers Workshop, and a second MFA in Theatre Arts. As a graduate of San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre’s Advanced Training Program, Sands has worked extensively as actor and director. A singer/songwriter, Sands recently produced a CD of her tunes, Rustler’s Moon. She teaches creative writing at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA,

Charles Hood recently published a piece in NER Digital. He is an essayist, poet, and photographer and a Research Fellow at the Center for Art + Environment, Nevada Museum of Art. He teaches English at Antelope Valley College. A graduate of U.C. Irvine, he studied under Charles Wright, Louise Glück, and James McMichael. His awards include a Fulbright in Ethnopoetics, an NEH, an Artist-in-Residency with the Annenberg Community Beach House in Santa Monica, an Artist-in-Residency with the Center for Land Use Interpretation, and a National Science Foundation Fellowship to Antarctica. His most recent book, South x South, won the Hollis Summers prize from Ohio University Press. He is finishing three manuscripts, including a poetry book about all 150 moons in the Solar System.

Lou Mathews, who also has a story in the current issue, is a Los Angeles based journalist, fiction writer, playwright and a fourth-generation Angeleno. Married at 19, he worked his way through U.C. Santa Cruz as a gas station attendant and mechanic and continued to work as a mechanic until he was 39. His first novel, L.A. Breakdown, about illegal street racing, was picked by the Los Angeles Times as a Best Book of 1999. He has received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction, a California Arts Council Fiction Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize and a Katherine Anne Porter Prize. His novella, The Irish Sextet, won Failbetter’s Tenth Anniversary novella contest. His story in the current New England Review “Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others” is from a new manuscript Hollywoodski. He has taught in the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program since 1989. He was also a contributing editor and restaurant reviewer for L.A. Style Magazine for seven years and 43 pounds.

Lindsay Hill Reads at Middlebury | Thurs., Sept. 25

Categories: Readings

LindsayCropNew England Review and the Middlebury College Creative Writing Program are pleased to present author Lindsay Hill, winner of the 2014 PEN USA Literary Award for Fiction.

He will read from and discuss his new novel, Sea of Hooks at Middlebury College’s Axinn Center, Abernethy Room at 4:30 p.m.

New York magazine and Publishers Weekly both named Sea of Hooks a top 10 book of 2013. Excerpts of its opening chapters are featured in New England Review (34.2). Publishers Weekly describes the book as “an almost impossibly sustained performance from beginning to end. Nearly every paragraph astonishes, every moment rich with magic and daring.”

Lindsay Hill was born in San Francisco and graduated from Bard College. Since 1974, he has published six books of poetry and his work has appeared in a wide variety of literary journals. Sea of Hooks is his first novel, the product of nearly twenty years of work. His other writing and editorial projects include the production of a series of recordings of innovative writing under the Spoken Engine label, and the co-editing, with Paul Naylor, of the literary journal Facture. Since leaving a career in banking, he has worked in the nonprofit sector. He lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife, the painter Nita Hill.

For more about Lindsay Hill, see the McPherson and Company website.

Rick Barot Named NER’s New Poetry Editor for Fall 2014

Categories: News & Notes

As many of our online readers already know, at the end of this summer NER’s poetry editor C. Dale Young will be leaving his post after nineteen years on our masthead. His last issue as poetry editor, due out in October, will feature 20 poems he selected over the years and highlight the range of work and joy of discovery he brought to the magazine. C. Dale began reading poetry for NER as a medical student in the mid-nineties, C-Dale-photo-2014continued on as associate editor, and then became poetry editor in 2000. We have been incredibly fortunate to have had such a passionate and discerning editor selecting work for our pages for so many years, and we salute C. Dale for his versatility, reliability, and dedication. We will miss him in ways we can’t yet imagine!

But we are equally fortunate to be able to announce that our new poetry editor will be Rick Barot. Rick is not only an accomplished poet but he is also a devoted reader and teacher of poetry with wide-ranging taste and vision. He served as a reader for NER for a number of years, in between publishing his poetry and essays in our pages. (Read his most recent essay, The Image Factory.) He begins as poetry editor in September.

Rick has published two books of poetry with Sarabande Books: The Darker Fall (2002), which received the Kathryn A. Morton Prize, and Want (2008), which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Artist Trust of Washington, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, and Stanford University, where he was a Wallace E. Stegner Fellow and a Jones Lecturer in Poetry. His poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications, including Poetry, The Paris Review, The New Republic, Ploughshares, Tin House, The Kenyon Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Threepenny Review. He lives in Tacoma, Washington, and teaches at Pacific Lutheran University, where he is also the director of The Rainier Writing Workshop, PLU’s low-residency MFA in creative writing. Sarabande will publish his third book of poems, Chord, in 2015.

We look forward to working with Rick in his new role, and to bringing our readers an ambitious and exciting selection of poetry in the issues to come.